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Productive Government Purchases and the Real Exchange Rate

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  • Parantap Basu
  • Robert Kollmann

Abstract

Empirical research documents that an exogenous rise in government purchases in a given country triggers a depreciation of its real exchange rate. This raises an important puzzle, as standard macro theories predict an appreciation of the real exchange rate. We argue that this prediction reflects the assumption that government purchases are unproductive. Using a simple model, we show that the real exchange rate may depreciate in response to a rise in government purchases, if those purchases increase domestic private sector productivity. A very small dose of public sector externality is sufficient to generate this result.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles in its series Working Papers ECARES with number 2010_001.

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Length: 9 p.
Date of creation: 2010
Date of revision:
Publication status: Published by:
Handle: RePEc:eca:wpaper:2010_001

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Keywords: Productive government purchases; real exchange rate;

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  1. Backus, David K. & Smith, Gregor W., 1993. "Consumption and real exchange rates in dynamic economies with non-traded goods," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(3-4), pages 297-316, November.
  2. Robert Kollmann, 1996. "Incomplete asset markets and the cross-country consumption correlation puzzle," ULB Institutional Repository 2013/7640, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
  3. Barro, Robert J., 1990. "Government Spending in a Simple Model of Endogeneous Growth," Scholarly Articles 3451296, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  4. Aschauer, David Alan, 1989. "Is public expenditure productive?," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(2), pages 177-200, March.
  5. Morten O. Ravn & Stephanie Schmitt-Grohe & Martin Uribe, 2007. "Explaining the Effects of Government Spending Shocks on Consumption and the Real Exchange Rate," Economics Working Papers ECO2007/23, European University Institute.
  6. Basu, Parantap, 2001. "Reserve Ratio, Seigniorage and Growth," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 23(3), pages 397-416, July.
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Cited by:
  1. Povoledo, Laura, 2012. "Modelling the sectoral allocation of labour in open economy models," MPRA Paper 40344, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  2. Iwata, Yasuharu, 2013. "Two fiscal policy puzzles revisited: New evidence and an explanation," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 33(C), pages 188-207.
  3. Agustín S. Bénétrix and Philip R. Lane, 2009. "Fiscal Shocks and The Real Exchange Rate," The Institute for International Integration Studies Discussion Paper Series iiisdp286, IIIS.
  4. Hyuk Rhee & Nurlan Turdaliev, 2012. "Targeting Rules for an Open Economy," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 23(3), pages 447-471, July.

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