Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Capital Intensity and U.S. Country Population Growth during the Late Nineteenth Century

Contents:

Author Info

  • Burton A. Abrams

    ()
    (Department of Economics, university pf Delaware)

  • Jing Li
  • James G. Mulligan

    ()
    (Department of Economics, University of Delaware)

Abstract

The United States witnessed substantial growth in manufacturing and urban populations during the last half of the nineteenth century. To date, no convincing evidence has been presented to explain the shift in population to urban areas. We find evidence that capital intensity, particularly new capital in the form of steam horsepower, played a significant role in drawing labor into counties and by inference into urban areas. This provides support for the hypothesis that the locational decisions of manufacturers and their placement of capital in urban areas fueled urban growth in the nineteenth century.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://graduate.lerner.udel.edu/sites/default/files/ECON/PDFs/RePEc/dlw/WorkingPapers/2012/UD-WP-2012-02.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University of Delaware, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 12-02.

as in new window
Length: 20 pages
Date of creation: 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:dlw:wpaper:12-02.

Contact details of provider:
Postal: Purnell Hall, Newark, Delaware 19716
Phone: (302) 831-2565
Fax: (302) 831-6968
Web page: http://www.lerner.udel.edu/departments/economics/department-economics/
More information through EDIRC

Related research

Keywords: urbanization; capital intensity; regional population growth; technological change;

Find related papers by JEL classification:

This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Sukkoo Kim, 2007. "Immigration, Industrial Revolution and Urban Growth in the United States, 1820-1920: Factor Endowments, Technology and Geography," NBER Working Papers 12900, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Abrams, Burton A. & Li, Jing & Mulligan, James G., 2008. "Did Corliss Steam Engines Fuel Urban Growth in the Late Nineteenth Century? Less Sanguine Results," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 68(04), pages 1172-1176, December.
  3. Jeremy Atack & Fred Bateman & Robert Margo, 2006. "Steam Power, Establishment Size, and Labor Productivity Growth in Nineteenth Century American Manufacturing," NBER Working Papers 11931, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:dlw:wpaper:12-02.. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Saul Hoffman).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.