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Development Impacts of Seasonal and Temporary Migration: A Review of Evidence from the Pacific and Southeast Asia

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  • John Gibson

    ()
    (University of Waikato, NIDEA and Motu)

  • David McKenzie

    ()
    (World Bank, BREAD, CEPR, CReAM and IZA)

  • Halahingano Rohorua

    (University of Waikato)

Abstract

Seasonal and temporary migration programs are widely used around the world, yet there is scant evidence as to their development impacts. Absent such evidence, it is difficult to evaluate whether the proliferation of temporary worker programs in recent years is a useful development. This article reviews studies that attempt to measure impacts of seasonal and temporary migration with a particular focus on evidence from the Pacific and Southeast Asia.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London in its series CReAM Discussion Paper Series with number 1308.

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Date of creation: Apr 2013
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Handle: RePEc:crm:wpaper:1308

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Keywords: Circular migration; Development impacts; Seasonal migration; Temporary migration;

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  1. John Gibson & David McKenzie & Steven Stillman, 2009. "The Impacts of International Migration on Remaining Household Members: Omnibus Results from a Migration Lottery Program," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 0920, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
  2. Michael Clemens, 2010. "The Roots of Global Wage Gaps: Evidence from Randomized Processing of U.S. Visas," Working Papers 212, Center for Global Development.
  3. Hall, Robert E & Mishkin, Frederic S, 1982. "The Sensitivity of Consumption to Transitory Income: Estimates from Panel Data on Households," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 50(2), pages 461-81, March.
  4. John Gibson & David McKenzie, 2014. "The Development Impact of a Best Practice Seasonal Worker Policy," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 96(2), pages 229-243, May.
  5. David McKenzie & Pilar Garcia Martinez & L. Alan Winters, 2008. "Who is coming from Vanuatu to New Zealand under the new Recognised Seasonal Employer (RSE) Program?," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 0806, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
  6. John Gibson & David McKenzie & Halahingano Rohorua, 2008. "How Pro-Poor is the Selection of Seasonal Migrant Workers from Tonga under New Zealand’s Recognised Seasonal Employer (RSE) Program?," Working Papers in Economics 08/08, University of Waikato, Department of Economics.
  7. Matthew Cummins & Francisco Rodriguez, 2010. "Is There a Numbers versus Rights Trade-off in Immigration Policy? What the Data Say," Journal of Human Development and Capabilities, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(2), pages 281-303.
  8. Bryan, Gharad & Chowdhury, Shyamal & Mobarak, Ahmed Mushfiq, 2012. "Seasonal Migration and Risk Aversion," CEPR Discussion Papers 8739, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  9. Kevin Lang & Jay L. Zagorsky, 2001. "Does Growing up with a Parent Absent Really Hurt?," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 36(2), pages 253-273.
  10. John Gibson & David Mckenzie, 2011. "Australia's Pacific Seasonal Worker Pilot Scheme (PSWPS): Development Impacts in the First Two Years," Working Papers in Economics 11/09, University of Waikato, Department of Economics.
  11. Gibson, John & McKenzie, David & Stillman, Steven, 2010. "Accounting for selectivity and duration-dependent heterogeneity when estimating the impact of emigration on incomes and poverty in sending areas," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5268, The World Bank.
  12. Danielle Hay & Stephen Howes, 2012. "Australia’s Pacific Seasonal Worker Pilot Scheme: why has take-up been so low?," Development Policy Centre Discussion Papers 1217, Development Policy Centre, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
  13. Constant, Amelie F. & Nottmeyer, Olga & Zimmermann, Klaus F., 2012. "The Economics of Circular Migration," IZA Discussion Papers 6940, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  14. David McKenzie, 2012. "Learning about migration through experiments," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 1207, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
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