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Knowledge Flows, Structure of Innovative Activity and International Specialization

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Abstract

This paper is a first attempt towards the full inclusion of a group of variables greatly studied in the current literature on innovation and industrial economics -such as knowledge links and the structure of competition and collaboration in a sector -into the determinants of the international technological specialization of countries. In particular, the major role of knowledge flows across sectors indicates that knowledge is a key factor affecting specialization and that the currently used notion of inter-sectoral spillovers has to be disentangled in a more detailed way and given a more precise meaning. It also points to that fact that a lot of theses knowledge flows are captured within a country. In particular this paper uses international trade, patent and citation data at a very fine level of disaggregation. It, first, shows that the relationship between international technological and trade specialisation of countries is positive and statistically significant. This extends previous results to a finer level of disaggregation and to a more recent time span. Secondly the determinants of technological specialisation are analysed. In particular the focus has been placed on the knowledge connections among sectors (in terms of patent citations), some key structural features of technological classes related to Schumpeterian competition (such as the concentration and asymmetries in innovative activities and the emergence of new innovators) and the relevance of networks in terms of technological co-operation. These variables have in general positive effects on the international technological specialisation of countries and important differences across sectors in the relevance of the factors affecting international specialisation emerge.

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File URL: ftp://ftp.unibocconi.it/pub/RePEc/cri/papers/wp119.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by KITeS, Centre for Knowledge, Internationalization and Technology Studies, Universita' Bocconi, Milano, Italy in its series KITeS Working Papers with number 119.

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Length: 31 pages
Date of creation: Nov 2000
Date of revision: Nov 2000
Handle: RePEc:cri:cespri:wp119

Note: This paper is part of the Research Project: Sectoral Systems in Europe - Innovation, Competitiveness and Growth (ESSY). Third Research and Technological Framework Programme, Targeted Socio-Economic Research, TSER
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Keywords: Technological specialisation; Trade specialisation; Knowledge spillovers; Market structure;

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References

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  1. Bent Dalum & Keld Laursen & Gert Villumsen, 1998. "Structural Change in OECD Export Specialisation Patterns: de-specialisation and 'stickiness'," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(3), pages 423-443.
  2. Antoine Magnier & Joël Toujas-Bernate, 1994. "Technology and trade: Empirical evidences for the major five industrialized countries," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer, vol. 130(3), pages 494-520, September.
  3. Keld Laursen & Ina Drejer, 1997. "Do Inter-sectoral Linkages Matter for International Export Specialisation?," DRUID Working Papers 97-15, DRUID, Copenhagen Business School, Department of Industrial Economics and Strategy/Aalborg University, Department of Business Studies.
  4. Breschi, Stefano & Malerba, Franco & Orsenigo, Luigi, 2000. "Technological Regimes and Schumpeterian Patterns of Innovation," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 110(463), pages 388-410, April.
  5. Malerba, Franco & Orsenigo, Luigi & Peretto, Pietro, 1997. "Persistence of innovative activities, sectoral patterns of innovation and international technological specialization," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 15(6), pages 801-826, October.
  6. Malerba, Franco & Orsenigo, Luigi, 1996. "Schumpeterian patterns of innovation are technology-specific," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 25(3), pages 451-478, May.
  7. Malerba, Franco & Orsenigo, Luigi, 2000. "Knowledge, Innovation Activities and Industrial Evolution," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 9(2), pages 289-313, June.
  8. Archibugi, Daniele & Pianta, Mario, 1994. "Aggregate Convergence and Sectoral Specialization in Innovation," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 4(1), pages 17-33, March.
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  12. Scherer, F M, 1982. "Inter-Industry Technology Flows and Productivity Growth," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 64(4), pages 627-34, November.
  13. Malerba, Franco & Orsenigo, Luigi, 1997. "Technological Regimes and Sectoral Patterns of Innovative Activities," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 6(1), pages 83-117.
  14. Malerba, Franco & Orsenigo, Luigi, 1995. "Schumpeterian Patterns of Innovation," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 19(1), pages 47-65, February.
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  16. Andrea Brasili & Paolo Epifani & Rodolfo Helg, 2000. "On the Dynamics of Trade Patterns," KITeS Working Papers 115, KITeS, Centre for Knowledge, Internationalization and Technology Studies, Universita' Bocconi, Milano, Italy, revised Jul 2000.
  17. Mary Amiti, 1997. "Specialisation Patterns in Europe," CEP Discussion Papers dp0363, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  18. Pavitt, Keith, 1984. "Sectoral patterns of technical change: Towards a taxonomy and a theory," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 13(6), pages 343-373, December.
  19. Archibugi, Daniele & Pianta, Mario, 1992. "Specialization and size of technological activities in industrial countries: The analysis of patent data," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 21(1), pages 79-93, February.
  20. Giovanni Amendola & Giovanni Dosi & Erasmo Papagni, 1993. "The dynamics of international competitiveness," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer, vol. 129(3), pages 451-471, September.
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  22. Malerba, Franco & Orsenigo, Luigi, 1999. "Technological entry, exit and survival: an empirical analysis of patent data," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 28(6), pages 643-660, August.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Singh, Lakhwinder, 2006. "Innovations, High-Tech Trade and Industrial Development: Theory, Evidence and Policy," Working Paper Series RP2006/27, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  2. Ginchev Ivan & Guerraggio Angelo & Rocca Matteo, 2002. "On second-order conditions in vector optimization," Economics and Quantitative Methods qf0218, Department of Economics, University of Insubria.
  3. Montobbio Fabio & Rampa Francesco, 2002. "The impact of technology and structural change on export performance on nine developing coutries," Economics and Quantitative Methods qf0219, Department of Economics, University of Insubria.

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