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Is it Good to Talk? Information Disclosure and Organisational Performance in the UK Incorporating evidence submitted on the DTI discussion paper 'High Performance Workplaces - Informing and Consulting Employees'

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  • Helen Bewley
  • Howard Gospel
  • R Peccei
  • P Willman

Abstract

The disclosure of information by management to employees varies significantly between workplaces. The effects of this variance on organizational performance are analysed using WERS98 data. The results show that the impact of information disclosure on organisational performance is more complex than is often assumed in the literature. Overall, there is a significant impact, both direct and indirect, and this varies depending on the level of employee organisational commitment, the type of information disclosed, and the performance outcome involved. On the whole, the positive effects are less in union settings and in situations where unions are strong.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Centre for Economic Performance, LSE in its series CEP Discussion Papers with number dp0602.

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Date of creation: Dec 2003
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Handle: RePEc:cep:cepdps:dp0602

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Web page: http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/publications/series.asp?prog=CEP

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  1. Williamson, Oliver E, 1983. "Credible Commitments: Using Hostages to Support Exchange," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 73(4), pages 519-40, September.
  2. Harvie Ramsay & Dora Scholarios & Bill Harley, 2000. "Employees and High-Performance Work Systems: Testing inside the Black Box," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 38(4), pages 501-531, December.
  3. Morris M. Kleiner & Marvin L. Bouillon, 1988. "Providing business information to production workers: Correlates of compensation and profitability," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 41(4), pages 605-617, July.
  4. Kochan, Thomas A., 1996. "What works at work : overview and assessment," Working papers 3886-96., Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Sloan School of Management.
  5. Motohiro Morishima, 1991. "Information sharing and collective bargaining in Japan: Effects on wage negotiation," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 44(3), pages 469-485, April.
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