Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

The Transfer Paradox in a One-Sector Overlapping Generations Model

Contents:

Author Info

  • Partha Sen

    (Department of Economics, Delhi School of Economics, Delhi, India)

  • Emily T. Cremers

    (National University of Singapore)

Abstract

This paper examines the effects of international income transfers on welfare and capital accumulation in a one-sector overlapping generations model. It is shown that a strong form of the transfer paradox-- in which the donor country experiences a welfare gain while the recipient country experiences a welfare loss—may occur both in and out of steady state. In addition, it is shown that a weak form of the transfer paradox—where either the donor or recipient (but not both) experience paradoxical welfare effects—may characterize all segments of the transition path not already characterized by the strong transfer paradox. The results are explained by the effects of transfers on world capital accumulation and the world interest rate, which imply secondary intertemporal welfare effects large enough to dominate the initial effects of the income transfer.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www.cdedse.org/pdf/work159.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Centre for Development Economics, Delhi School of Economics in its series Working papers with number 159.

as in new window
Length: 34 pages
Date of creation: Aug 2007
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:cde:cdewps:159

Contact details of provider:
Postal: Delhi 110 007
Phone: (011) 27667005
Fax: (011) 27667159
Email:
Web page: http://www.cdedse.org/
More information through EDIRC

Order Information:
Email:
Web: http://www.cdedse.org/

Related research

Keywords: Transfer problem; transfer paradox; dynamics; one-sector overlapping generations model;

Other versions of this item:

Find related papers by JEL classification:

This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Sosin, Kim H & Fairchild, Loretta G, 1984. "Nonhomotheticity and Technological Bias in Production," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 66(1), pages 44-50, February.
  2. Yano, Makoto, 1983. "Welfare aspects of the transfer problem," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(3-4), pages 277-289, November.
  3. Andrew B. Abel & N. Gregory Mankiw & Lawrence H. Summers & Richard J. Zeckhauser, 1986. "Assessing Dynamic Efficiency: Theory and Evidence," NBER Working Papers 2097, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Galor, Oded & Ryder, Harl E., 1989. "Existence, uniqueness, and stability of equilibrium in an overlapping-generations model with productive capital," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 49(2), pages 360-375, December.
  5. Galor, O & Polemarchakis, H M, 1987. "Intertemporal Equilibrium and the Transfer Paradox," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 54(1), pages 147-56, January.
  6. repec:ebl:ecbull:v:6:y:2006:i:3:p:1-8 is not listed on IDEAS
  7. Brecher, Richard A. & Bhagwati, Jagdish N., 1982. "Immiserizing transfers from abroad," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 13(3-4), pages 353-364, November.
  8. Bhagwati, Jagdish N & Brecher, Richard A & Hatta, Tatsuo, 1985. "The Generalized Theory of Transfers and Welfare: Exogenous (Policy-imposed) and Endogenous (Transfer-induced) Distortions," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 100(3), pages 697-714, August.
  9. Gale, David, 1974. "Exchange equilibrium and coalitions : An example," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 1(1), pages 63-66, March.
  10. Bhagwati, Jagdish N & Brecher, Richard A & Hatta, Tatsuo, 1983. "The Generalized Theory of Transfers and Welfare: Bilateral Transfers in a Multilateral World," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 73(4), pages 606-18, September.
  11. Haaparanta, Pertti, 1989. "The intertemporal effects of international transfers," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(3-4), pages 371-382, May.
  12. Tan, Kim-Heng, 1998. "International Transfers from Rich to Poor Nations," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 6(3), pages 461-71, August.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Cremers, Emily & Sen, Partha, 2011. "Transfers, the Terms of Trade and Capital Accumulation," Staff General Research Papers 34611, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  2. Emily T. Cremers, 2008. "Transfers, the Terms of Trade and Capital Accumulation," DEGIT Conference Papers c013_018, DEGIT, Dynamics, Economic Growth, and International Trade.
  3. Capello, Marcelo & Figueras, Alberto & Freille, Sebastian & Moncarz, Pedro, 2013. "The role of federal transfers in regional convergence in human development indicators in Argentina," Investigaciones Regionales, Asociación Española de Ciencia Regional, issue 27, pages 33-63.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:cde:cdewps:159. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Sanjeev Sharma).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.