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Self-generated Validity, Framing Effects, and Survey Research in IS

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    Abstract

    Based on the accessibility-diagnosticity cognitive framework, we discuss self-generated validity and framing effects as two method biases that can threaten the validity of survey research results. Two empirical studies are used to establish their presence in IS research. We discuss their research implications, with a focus on model comparison and the testing of new instruments or theories. We also suggest a number methodological remedies that can control these method biases, including randomization or partial randomization of question items, temporal separation of construct measurements, replication of research studies, experimental methods and multilevel analysis with split-sample design.

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    File URL: http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/~lizecon/RePEc/bbr/pdf/11.pdf
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by International Centre for Behavioural Business Research in its series ICBBR Working Papers with number 11.

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    Date of creation: 06 May 2010
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    Handle: RePEc:bbr:workpa:11

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    Keywords: IT; Questionnaire surveys; User acceptance of IT; IT diffusion and adoption.;

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    1. Viswanath Venkatesh & Fred D. Davis, 2000. "A Theoretical Extension of the Technology Acceptance Model: Four Longitudinal Field Studies," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 46(2), pages 186-204, February.
    2. Fred D. Davis & Richard P. Bagozzi & Paul R. Warshaw, 1989. "User Acceptance of Computer Technology: A Comparison of Two Theoretical Models," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 35(8), pages 982-1003, August.
    3. Sendhil Mullainathan & Marianne Bertrand, 2001. "Do People Mean What They Say? Implications for Subjective Survey Data," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(2), pages 67-72, May.
    4. John G. Lynch Jr., 2006. "Accessibility-Diagnosticity and the Multiple Pathway Anchoring and Adjustment Model," Journal of Consumer Research, University of Chicago Press, vol. 33(1), pages 25-27, 06.
    5. Naresh K. Malhotra & Sung S. Kim & Ashutosh Patil, 2006. "Common Method Variance in IS Research: A Comparison of Alternative Approaches and a Reanalysis of Past Research," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 52(12), pages 1865-1883, December.
    6. Ahluwalia, Rohini & Gurhan-Canli, Zeynep, 2000. " The Effects of Extensions of the Family Brand Name: An Accessibility-Diagnosticity Perspective," Journal of Consumer Research, University of Chicago Press, vol. 27(3), pages 371-81, December.
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