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Barriers to Entry and Development

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One of the most challenging questions in economics is why some countries are so much richer than others. In this paper, we assess the role of cross-country differences in barriers to entry. This is motivated by the recent evidence about both their prevalence in the third world and their harmful economic consequences. We construct a growth model with capital in which barriers to entry give monopoly power to insider groups and allow them to extract rents. Our first contribution is to solve the dynamic rent-seeking problem of the insider groups and show that larger barriers reduce TFP, the capital-output ratio, and per-capita GDP and increase the relative price of capital. In other words, our model is consistent with the evidence that poorer countries have lower TFPs and capital-output ratios and higher relative prices of capital. Our second contribution is to take our model to the data and assess quantitatively the aggregate implications of barriers to entry. Our most important finding is that barriers to entry have non-linear effects: while small to medium-sized barriers are harmful, large barriers can have disastrous quantitative effects.

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Paper provided by Department of Economics, W. P. Carey School of Business, Arizona State University in its series Working Papers with number 2167726.

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Handle: RePEc:asu:wpaper:2167726

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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Berthold Herrendorf & Akos Valentinyi, 2005. "Which Sectors Make the Poor Countries so Unproductive?," IEHAS Discussion Papers 0519, Institute of Economics, Centre for Economic and Regional Studies, Hungarian Academy of Sciences.
  2. Xu Yi & Nezih Guner & Gustavo Ventura, 2005. "Macroeconomic Implications of Size Dependent Policies," 2005 Meeting Papers 530, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  3. Lee Ohanian & David Lagakos & Simeon Alder, 2012. "The Decline of the U.S. Rust Belt: A Macroeconomic Analysis," 2012 Meeting Papers 793, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  4. Diagne, Youssoupha S, 2013. "Impact of business environment on investment and output of manufacturing firms in Senegal," MPRA Paper 54227, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  5. Lei Fang, 2009. "Entry barriers, competition, and technology adoption," Working Paper 2009-08, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
  6. Benjamin Bridgman, 2011. "Competition, Work Rules and Productivity," 2011 Meeting Papers 289, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  7. Trevor Tombe, 2012. "The Missing Food Problem," Working Papers tt0060, Wilfrid Laurier University, Department of Economics, revised 2012.
  8. Simeon Alder, 2009. "In the Wrong Hands: Complementarities, Resource Allocation, and Aggregate TFP," 2009 Meeting Papers 1265, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  9. David Lagakos, 2009. "Superstores or mom and pops? Technolgy adoption and productivity differences in retail trade," Staff Report 428, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.

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