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Discerning welfare impacts of public provision of recreation areas

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  • Huhtala, Anni
  • Pouta, Eija

Abstract

This study presents a framework for investigating responses to the supply of public recreation opportunities when supply affects both probability of use and frequency of use days. These components are used to estimate the marginal social net benefits of an exogenous increase in the supply of public recreation opportunities. The study investigates distributional patterns of visiting behavior and benefit estimates for alternative supply strategies, i.e., reduced distance or increased acreage. The results indicate that the probability of participation and the number of use days respond differently to alternative supply strategies and that response varies by income group.

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File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/11860
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by MTT Agrifood Research Finland in its series Discussion Papers with number 11860.

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Date of creation: 2006
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Handle: RePEc:ags:mttfdp:11860

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Keywords: Resource /Energy Economics and Policy;

References

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  1. Phaneuf, Daniel J. & Smith, V. Kerry, 2006. "Recreation Demand Models," Handbook of Environmental Economics, in: K. G. Mäler & J. R. Vincent (ed.), Handbook of Environmental Economics, edition 1, volume 2, chapter 15, pages 671-761 Elsevier.
  2. Huhtala, Anni, 2004. "What price recreation in Finland? – A contingent valuation study of non-market benefits of public outdoor recreation areas," MPRA Paper 24602, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  3. Gibson, Betty Blecha, 1980. "Estimating Demand Elasticities for Public Goods from Survey Data," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 70(5), pages 1069-76, December.
  4. Englin, Jeffrey & Lambert, David & Shaw, W. Douglass, 1997. "A Structural Equations Approach to Modeling Consumptive Recreation Demand," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 33(1), pages 33-43, May.
  5. Bergstrom, Theodore C & Goodman, Robert P, 1973. "Private Demands for Public Goods," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 63(3), pages 280-96, June.
  6. Mark L. Rockel & Mary Jo Kealy, 1991. "The Value of Nonconsumptive Wildlife Recreation in the United States," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 67(4), pages 422-434.
  7. R. M. Adams & O. Bergland & W. N. Musser & S. L. Johnson & L. M. Musser, 1989. "User Fees and Equity Issues in Public Hunting Expenditures: The Case of Ring-Necked Pheasant in Oregon," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 65(4), pages 376-385.
  8. Phaneuf, Daniel J., 1999. "A Dual Approach to Modeling Corner Solutions in Recreation Demand," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 85-105, January.
  9. W. Douglas Shaw & J. Scott Shonkwiler, 2000. "Brand Choice and Purchase Frequency Revisited: An Application to Recreation Behavior," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 82(3), pages 515-526.
  10. Krinsky, Itzhak & Robb, A Leslie, 1986. "On Approximating the Statistical Properties of Elasticities," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 68(4), pages 715-19, November.
  11. Parsons, George R. & Jakus, Paul M. & Tomasi, Ted, 1999. "A Comparison of Welfare Estimates from Four Models for Linking Seasonal Recreational Trips to Multinomial Logit Models of Site Choice," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 38(2), pages 143-157, September.
  12. Feather Peter & Hellerstein Daniel & Tomasi Theodore, 1995. "A Discrete-Count Model of Recreational Demand," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 29(2), pages 214-227, September.
  13. Nancy E. Bockstael & Ivar E. Strand, Jr. & Kenneth E. McConnell & Firuzeh Arsanjani, 1990. "Sample Selection Bias in the Estimation of Recreation Demand Functions: An Application to Sportfishing," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 66(1), pages 40-49.
  14. Loomis, John B., 1995. "Four models for determining environmental quality effects on recreational demand and regional economics," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 12(1), pages 55-65, January.
  15. Feinerman, Eli & Fleischer, Aliza & Simhon, Avi, 2004. "Distributional Welfare Impacts of Public Spending: The Case of Urban versus National Parks," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 29(02), August.
  16. Nick Hanley & Robert Wright & Gary Koop, 2002. "Modelling Recreation Demand Using Choice Experiments: Climbing in Scotland," Environmental & Resource Economics, European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 22(3), pages 449-466, July.
  17. K. E. McConnell, 1999. "Household Labor Market Choices and the Demand for Recreation," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 75(3), pages 466-477.
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