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Estimating intergenerational utility distribution preferences

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  • Scarborough, Helen
  • Bennett, Jeffrey W.

Abstract

Resource management decisions influence not only the output of the economy but also the distribution of utility between groups within the community. The theory of Benefit Cost Analysis provides a means of incorporating this distributional change through the application of distributional or welfare weights. This paper reports the results of research designed to estimate distributional weights suitable for inclusion in a Benefit Cost Analysis framework. The findings of a choice modelling experiment estimating community preferences with respect to intergenerational utility distribution are presented to illustrate this innovative application of a stated preference technique.

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File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/139899
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society in its series 2006 Conference (50th), February 8-10, 2006, Sydney, Australia with number 139899.

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Date of creation: 2006
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Handle: RePEc:ags:aare06:139899

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Related research

Keywords: Distributional weights; Choice Modelling; Intergenerational distribution; Benefit Cost Analysis; Community/Rural/Urban Development; Resource /Energy Economics and Policy;

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  1. Krinsky, Itzhak & Robb, A Leslie, 1986. "On Approximating the Statistical Properties of Elasticities," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 68(4), pages 715-19, November.
  2. Hege Medin & Karine Nyborg & Ian Bateman, 1998. "The Assumption of Equal Marginal Utility of Income: How Much Does it Matter?," Discussion Papers 241, Research Department of Statistics Norway.
  3. Helen Scarborough & Jeff Bennett & Rodney Carr, 2004. "Using Choice Modeling to Investigate Equity Preferences," Economics Series 2004_03, Deakin University, Faculty of Business and Law, School of Accounting, Economics and Finance.
  4. Giles Atkinson & Fernando Machado & Susana Mourato, 2000. "Balancing competing principles of environmental equity," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 32(10), pages 1791-1806, October.
  5. A. Markandya, 1998. "Poverty, Income Distribution and Policy Making," Environmental & Resource Economics, European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 11(3), pages 459-472, April.
  6. Nyborg, Karine, 2000. "Homo Economicus and Homo Politicus: interpretation and aggregation of environmental values," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 42(3), pages 305-322, July.
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