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The Fiscal Effects of U.S. Immigration: A Generational-Accounting Perspective

In: Tax Policy and the Economy, Volume 14

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  • Alan J. Auerbach
  • Philip Oreopoulos

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This chapter was published in:

  • James M. Poterba, 2000. "Tax Policy and the Economy, Volume 14," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number pote00-2.
    This item is provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Chapters with number 10849.

    Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberch:10849

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    Postal: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge, MA 02138, U.S.A.
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    Web page: http://www.nber.org
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    Cited by:
    1. Frédéric Docquier & Hillel Rapoport, 2007. "L'immigration qualifiée, remède miracle aux problèmes économiques européens ?," Reflets et perspectives de la vie économique, De Boeck Université, vol. 0(1), pages 95-111.
    2. Dobra, Alexandra, 2009. "Identifying the key issues focusing on the costs and benefits of immigration in developed countries," MPRA Paper 16806, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Kotlikoff, Laurence J., 2002. "Generational policy," Handbook of Public Economics, in: A. J. Auerbach & M. Feldstein (ed.), Handbook of Public Economics, edition 1, volume 4, chapter 27, pages 1873-1932 Elsevier.
    4. Timothy Miller & Ronald Lee, 2000. "Immigration, Social Security, and Broader Fiscal Impacts," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(2), pages 350-354, May.
    5. Dobra, Alexandra, 2009. "Principal concerns concentrating on the costs and benefits of immigration in developed countries," MPRA Paper 16817, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Xavier Chojnicki & Frédéric Docquier & Lionel Ragot, 2011. "Should the US have locked heaven’s door?," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 24(1), pages 317-359, January.
    7. Chojnicki, Xavier & Docquier, Frédéric & Ragot, Lionel, 2005. "Should the U.S. Have Locked the Heaven's Door? Reassessing the Benefits of the Postwar Immigration," IZA Discussion Papers 1676, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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