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Italy: A Never-Ending Pension Reform

In: Social Security Pension Reform in Europe

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  • Daniele Franco

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This chapter was published in:

  • Martin Feldstein & Horst Siebert, 2002. "Social Security Pension Reform in Europe," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number feld02-2, October.
    This item is provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Chapters with number 10674.

    Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberch:10674

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    Citations

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    Cited by:
    1. Ranzani, Marco, 2006. "Social Security and Labour Supply: the Italian 1992 Reform as a Natural Experiment," MPRA Paper 16569, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Dec 2008.
    2. Marcello D’Amato & Vincenzo Galasso, 2002. "Assessing the Political Sustainability of Parametric Social Security Reforms: the Case of Italy," Giornale degli Economisti, GDE (Giornale degli Economisti e Annali di Economia), Bocconi University, vol. 61(2), pages 171-213, December.
    3. Poteraj, Jarosław, 2008. "Systemy Emerytalne W Europie – Włochy
      [Pension Systems In Europe – Italy]
      ," MPRA Paper 34645, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Kruse, Agneta, 2005. "Political economy and pensions in ageing societies – a note on how an ”impossible” reform was implemented in Sweden," Working Papers 2005:35, Lund University, Department of Economics.
    5. Kristiyan Hadjiev, 2005. "Transformation Model for Organisational Development," Economic Thought journal, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences - Economic Research Institute, issue 5, pages 37-52.
    6. Balmaseda, Manuel & Melguizo, Angel & Taguas, David, 2006. "Las reformas necesarias en el sistema de pensiones contributivas en España
      [Reforming the Spanish contributory pension system]
      ," MPRA Paper 19574, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 01 Mar 2006.
    7. Robert Fenge & Martin Werding, 2003. "Ageing and the Tax Implied in Public Pension Schemes: Simulations for Selected OECD Countries," CESifo Working Paper Series 841, CESifo Group Munich.
    8. Góra, Marek & Palmer, Edward, 2004. "Shifting Perspectives in Pensions," IZA Discussion Papers 1369, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    9. Bruno Chiarini & Paolo Piselli, 2012. "Equilibrium earning premium and pension schemes: The long-run macroeconomic effects of the union," Discussion Papers 2_2012, D.E.S. (Department of Economic Studies), University of Naples "Parthenope", Italy.
    10. Bravo, Jorge H., 2001. "The Chilean Pension System: A Review of Some Remaining Difficulties After 20 Years of Reform," Discussion Paper 7, Center for Intergenerational Studies, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
    11. Chiara Saraceno & Wolfgang Keck, 2011. "Towards an integrated approach for the analysis of gender equity in policies supporting paid work and care responsibilities," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 25(11), pages 371-406, August.
    12. John B. Shoven & Sita N. Slavov, 2006. "Political Risk Versus Market Risk in Social Security," NBER Working Papers 12135, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    13. John B. Williamson, 2001. "Future Prospects for Notional Defined Contribution Schemes," CESifo Forum, Ifo Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 2(4), pages 19-24, October.
    14. Agar Brugiavini & Franco Peracchi, 2004. "Micro-Modeling of Retirement Behavior in Italy," NBER Chapters, in: Social Security Programs and Retirement around the World: Micro-Estimation, pages 345-398 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    15. Arie Kapteyn & Constantijn Panis, 2003. "The Size and Composition of Wealth Holdings in the United States, Italy, and the Netherlands," Working Papers 03-05, RAND Corporation Publications Department.
    16. Paolo Pertile & Veronica Polin & Pietro Rizza & Marzia Romanelli, 2012. "Public finance consolidation and fairness across living generations: the case of Italy," Working Papers 04/2012, University of Verona, Department of Economics.
    17. Anderson, Karen M. & Keading, Michael, 2008. "Pension systems in the European Union: Variable patterns of influence in Italy, the Netherlands and Belgium," MPRA Paper 21139, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    18. Agar Brugiavini & Vincenzo Galasso, 2003. "The Social Security Reform Process in Italy: Where do We Stand?," Working Papers wp052, University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center.
    19. Gabriella Berloffa & Paola Villa, 2007. "Inequality across cohorts of households: evidence from Italy," Department of Economics Working Papers 0711, Department of Economics, University of Trento, Italia.

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