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Direct Investment, Rising Real Wages and the Absorption of Excess Labor in the Periphery

In: G7 Current Account Imbalances: Sustainability and Adjustment

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  • Michael P. Dooley
  • David Folkerts-Landau
  • Peter Garber

Abstract

This paper sets out the political economy behind Asian governments' participation in a revived Bretton Woods System. The overriding problem for these governments is to rapidly integrate a large pool of underemployed labor into the industrial sector. The principal constraints are inefficient domestic resource and capital markets, and resistance to import penetration by labor in industrial countries. The system has evolved to overcome these constraints through export led growth and growth of foreign direct investment. Periphery governments' objectives for the scale and composition of gross trade in goods and financial assets may dominate more conventional concerns about international capital flows.

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This chapter was published in:

  • Richard H. Clarida, 2007. "G7 Current Account Imbalances: Sustainability and Adjustment," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number clar06-2.
    This item is provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Chapters with number 0125.

    Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberch:0125

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    1. Michael P. Dooley & David Folkerts-Landau & Peter Garber, 2003. "An Essay on the Revived Bretton Woods System," NBER Working Papers 9971, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Boyreau-Debray, Genevieve & Wei, Shang-Jin, 2004. "Pitfalls of a State-Dominated Financial System: The Case of China," CEPR Discussion Papers 4471, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    3. Assaf Razin & Efraim Sadka, 2002. "Gains from FDI Inflows with Incomplete Information," NBER Working Papers 9008, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Eswar Prasad & Shang-Jin Wei, 2007. "The Chinese Approach to Capital Inflows: Patterns and Possible Explanations," NBER Chapters, in: Capital Controls and Capital Flows in Emerging Economies: Policies, Practices and Consequences, pages 421-480 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Shang-Jin Wei & Eswar Prasad, 2005. "The Chinese Approach to Capital Inflows," IMF Working Papers 05/79, International Monetary Fund.
    6. Devarajan, Shantayanan & Fisher, Anthony C, 1981. "Hotelling's "Economics of Exhaustible Resources": Fifty Years Later," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 19(1), pages 65-73, March.
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