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John Shea

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This is information that was supplied by John Shea in registering through RePEc. If you are John Shea , you may change this information at the RePEc Author Service. Or if you are not registered and would like to be listed as well, register at the RePEc Author Service. When you register or update your RePEc registration, you may identify the papers and articles you have authored.

Personal Details

First Name: John
Middle Name:
Last Name: Shea
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RePEc Short-ID: psh560

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Homepage:
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Affiliation

Department of Economics
University of Maryland
Location: College Park, Maryland (United States)
Homepage: http://www.bsos.umd.edu/econ/
Email:
Phone: 301-405-3266
Fax: 301-405-3542
Postal: College Park, MD 20742
Handle: RePEc:edi:deumdus (more details at EDIRC)

Works

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Working papers

  1. John Shea, 1998. "What Do Technology Shocks Do?," NBER Working Papers 6632, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. John Shea, 1997. "Does Parents' Money Matter?," NBER Working Papers 6026, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. John Shea, 1996. "Instrument Relevance in Multivariate Linear Models: A Simple Measure," NBER Technical Working Papers 0193, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. John Shea, 1995. "Complementarities and Comovements," NBER Working Papers 5305, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Shea, J., 1995. "Comovements in Cities," Working papers 9522, Wisconsin Madison - Social Systems.
  6. Shea, J., 1993. "Myopia, Liquidity Constraints, and Aggregate Consumption: A Simple Test," Working papers 9305, Wisconsin Madison - Social Systems.
  7. Shea, J., 1993. "Should We Test the Life Cycle-Permanent Income Hypothsis with Food Consumption Data?," Working papers 9303, Wisconsin Madison - Social Systems.
  8. Shea, J., 1993. "Instrument Relevance in Linear Models: A Simple Measure," Working papers 9312, Wisconsin Madison - Social Systems.
  9. Shea, J., 1992. "Union Contracts and Life Cycle - Permanent Income Hypothesis," Working papers 9223, Wisconsin Madison - Social Systems.
  10. Shea, J., 1991. "The Input-Output Approach to Demand-Shift Instrumental Variable Selection," Working papers 9114, Wisconsin Madison - Social Systems.
  11. Shea, J., 1991. "Do Supply Curves Slope Up?," Working papers 9116, Wisconsin Madison - Social Systems.
  12. Shea, J., 1991. "The Input-Output Approach to Demand-Shift Instrumental Variable Selection: Technical Appendix," Working papers 9115, Wisconsin Madison - Social Systems.
  13. Shea, J., 1990. "Accident Rates, Labor Effort And The Business Cycle," Working papers 90-28, Wisconsin Madison - Social Systems.

Articles

  1. Shea, John, 2000. "Does parents' money matter?," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 77(2), pages 155-184, August.
  2. John Shea, 1997. "Instrument Relevance in Multivariate Linear Models: A Simple Measure," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 79(2), pages 348-352, May.
  3. Shea, John, 1996. "Comovement in cities," Carnegie-Rochester Conference Series on Public Policy, Elsevier, vol. 44(1), pages 169-206, June.
  4. Shea, John, 1995. "Myopia, Liquidity Constraints, and Aggregate Consumption: A Simple Test," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 27(3), pages 798-805, August.
  5. Shea, John, 1995. "Union Contracts and the Life-Cycle/Permanent-Income Hypothesis," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 85(1), pages 186-200, March.
  6. Shea, John & Gobeli, David, 1995. "TQM: The experiences of ten small businesses," Business Horizons, Elsevier, vol. 38(1), pages 71-77.
  7. Shea, John, 1994. "Should we test the life cycle--permanent income hypothesis with food consumption data?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 45(1), pages 63-68, May.
  8. Shea, John, 1993. "The Input-Output Approach to Instrument Selection," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 11(2), pages 145-55, April.
  9. Shea, John, 1993. "Do Supply Curves Slope Up?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 108(1), pages 1-32, February.

Chapters

  1. John Shea, 1999. "What Do Technology Shocks Do?," NBER Chapters, in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 1998, volume 13, pages 275-322 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

Statistics

This author is among the top 5% authors according to these criteria:
  1. Number of Distinct Works, Weighted by Recursive Impact Factor
  2. Number of Distinct Works, Weighted by Number of Authors and Simple Impact Factors
  3. Number of Distinct Works, Weighted by Number of Authors and Recursive Impact Factors
  4. Number of Citations, Weighted by Recursive Impact Factor
  5. Number of Citations, Weighted by Number of Authors and Simple Impact Factors
  6. Number of Citations, Weighted by Number of Authors and Simple Impact Factors, Discounted by Citation Age
  7. Number of Citations, Weighted by Number of Authors and Recursive Impact Factors
  8. Number of Citations, Weighted by Number of Authors and Recursive Impact Factors, Discounted by Citation Age
  9. Number of Registered Citing Authors, Weighted by Rank (Max. 1 per Author)
  10. Number of Journal Pages, Weighted by Number of Authors and Recursive Impact Factors
  11. Breadth of citations across fields
  12. Wu-Index

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