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Explaining hump-shaped inflation responses to monetary policy shocks

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  • James Yetman

    (University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong)

Abstract

According to conventional wisdom, the output effects of a monetary policy shock commence within months of the shock, while most inflationary effects lag significantly. We demonstrate a simple model that can explain the conventional wisdom and is consistent with profit maximizing price setting decisions by firms, based on the assumption that renegotiating existing contracts is costly. Thus, firms jointly choose both their price and the expected length of time for which that price will hold each time they re-contract. We show that such a 'sticky contracting' assumption, combined with menu costs, generates a hump-shaped inflation response to monetary policy shocks. Copyright © 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1002/mde.1326
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. in its journal Managerial and Decision Economics.

Volume (Year): 28 (2007)
Issue (Month): 6 ()
Pages: 605-617

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Handle: RePEc:wly:mgtdec:v:28:y:2007:i:6:p:605-617

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Web page: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/7976

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  1. Marco Bonomo & Carlos Carvalho, 2010. "Imperfectly Credible Disinflation under Endogenous Time-Dependent Pricing," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 42(5), pages 799-831, 08.
  2. Jean-Pascal BENASSY, 2003. "Staggered contracts and persistence : microeconomic foundations and macroeconomic dynamics," Discussion Papers (REL - Recherches Economiques de Louvain) 2003021, Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES).
  3. Lawrence J. Christiano & Martin Eichenbaum & Charles Evans, 2001. "Nominal rigidities and the dynamic effects of a shock to monetary policy," Proceedings, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, issue Jun.
  4. Anil K Kashyap, 1994. "Sticky Prices: New Evidence from Retail Catalogs," NBER Working Papers 4855, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. N. Gregory Mankiw & Ricardo Reis, 2001. "Sticky Information Versus Sticky Prices: A Proposal to Replace the New Keynesian Phillips Curve," Harvard Institute of Economic Research Working Papers 1922, Harvard - Institute of Economic Research.
  6. Mankiw, N Gregory, 1985. "Small Menu Costs and Large Business Cycles: A Macroeconomic Model," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 100(2), pages 529-38, May.
  7. Calvo, Guillermo A., 1983. "Staggered prices in a utility-maximizing framework," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 12(3), pages 383-398, September.
  8. Rotemberg, Julio J., 2005. "Customer anger at price increases, changes in the frequency of price adjustment and monetary policy," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(4), pages 829-852, May.
  9. Dutta, Shantanu, et al, 1999. "Menu Costs, Posted Prices, and Multiproduct Retailers," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 31(4), pages 683-703, November.
  10. Davis, Michael C & Hamilton, James D, 2004. "Why Are Prices Sticky? The Dynamics of Wholesale Gasoline Prices," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 36(1), pages 17-37, February.
  11. Michael Dotsey & Robert G. King & Alexander L. Wolman, 1999. "State-Dependent Pricing And The General Equilibrium Dynamics Of Money And Output," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 114(2), pages 655-690, May.
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Cited by:
  1. Mankiw, N. Gregory & Reis, Ricardo, 2002. "Sticky Information Versus Sticky Prices: A Proposal to Replace the New Keynesian Phillips Curve," Scholarly Articles 3415324, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  2. Daniel Levy, 2006. "Price Rigidity and Flexibility: Recent Theoretical Developments," Emory Economics 0608, Department of Economics, Emory University (Atlanta).

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