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Understanding the Twentieth-Century Growth in U.S. School Spending

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  • Eric A. Hanushek
  • Steven G. Rivkin

Abstract

Persistent increases in spending on elementary and secondary schools have gone virtually undocumented. Real expenditure per student increased 3½ percent per year over the period 1890-1990. Decomposition of the spending growth shows that it resulted from a combination of falling pupil-staff ratios, increasing real wages to teachers, and rising expenditure outside of the classroom. Although the expansion of education for the handicapped has had a disproportionate effect on spending, most of the growth in expenditure during the 1980s came from other sources. Significant teacher salary increases, particularly for females, have failed to keep up with wages in other occupations.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by University of Wisconsin Press in its journal Journal of Human Resources.

Volume (Year): 32 (1997)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 35-68

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Handle: RePEc:uwp:jhriss:v:32:y:1997:i:1:p:35-68

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Web page: http://jhr.uwpress.org/

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Cited by:
  1. Hanushek, Eric A., 2006. "Alternative school policies and the benefits of general cognitive skills," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 25(4), pages 447-462, August.
  2. Chingos, Matthew M. & West, Martin R., 2011. "Promotion and reassignment in public school districts: How do schools respond to differences in teacher effectiveness?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(3), pages 419-433, June.
  3. Gregory Gilpin & Michael Kaganovich, 2011. "The Quantity and Quality of Teachers: Dynamics of the Trade-off," Caepr Working Papers 2011-006, Center for Applied Economics and Policy Research, Economics Department, Indiana University Bloomington.
  4. Gundlach, Erich, 2001. "Education and economic development : an empirical perspective," Open Access Publications from Kiel Institute for the World Economy 2629, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
  5. Gilpin, Gregory A., 2011. "Reevaluating the effect of non-teaching wages on teacher attrition," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(4), pages 598-616, August.
  6. Steven G. Rivkin & Eric A. Hanushek & John F. Kain, 2005. "Teachers, Schools, and Academic Achievement," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 73(2), pages 417-458, 03.
  7. Matthew M. Chingos & Kenneth A. Couch, 2013. "Class Size and Student Outcomes: Research and Policy Implications," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 32(2), pages 411-438, 03.
  8. Harris, Amy Rehder & Evans, William N. & Schwab, Robert M., 2001. "Education spending in an aging America," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 81(3), pages 449-472, September.
  9. Shin, Jaeun & Moon, Sangho, 2006. "Fertility, relative wages, and labor market decisions: A case of female teachers," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 25(6), pages 591-604, December.

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