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The Impact of Children on Married Women's Labor Supply: Black-White Differentials Revisited

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  • Evelyn L. Lehrer

Abstract

Previous studies have documented that the depressing effect of children on labor supply is greater for white wives than for their black counterparts. The present paper examines the hypothesis that this difference by race is less pronounced in the highly educated segments of the population. Multinomial logit estimates of a labor supply model using data from the 1982 National Survey of Family Growth are consistent with the hypothesis.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by University of Wisconsin Press in its journal Journal of Human Resources.

Volume (Year): 27 (1992)
Issue (Month): 3 ()
Pages: 422-444

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Handle: RePEc:uwp:jhriss:v:27:y:1992:i:3:p:422-444

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Web page: http://jhr.uwpress.org/

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Cited by:
  1. Xiaodi Xie, 1997. "Children and female labour supply behaviour," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 29(10), pages 1303-1310.
  2. Bardasi, Elena & Gornick, Janet C., 2000. "Women and part-time employment: workers' 'choices' and wage penalties in five industrialized countries," ISER Working Paper Series 2000-11, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
  3. Joyce P. Jacobsen & James Wishart Pearce III & Joshua L. Rosenbloom, 1999. "The Effects of Childbearing on Married Women's Labor Supply and Earnings: Using Twin Births as a Natural Experiment," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 34(3), pages 449-474.
  4. Julian P. Cristia, 2006. "The Effect of a First Child on Female Labor Supply: Evidence from Women Seeking Fertility Services: Working Paper 2006-11," Working Papers 18233, Congressional Budget Office.
  5. Lehrer, Evelyn L. & Chen, Yu, 2013. "The Labor Market Behavior of Married Women with Young Children in the U.S.: Have Differences by Religion Disappeared?," IZA Discussion Papers 7254, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  6. Dante Contreras & Esteban Puentes & David Bravo, 2005. "Female labour force participation in greater santiago, Chile: 1957-1997. A synthetic cohort analysis," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 17(2), pages 169-186.
  7. Troske, Kenneth & Voicu, Alexandru, 2004. "Joint Estimation of Sequential Labor Force Participation and Fertility Decisions Using Markov Chain Monte Carlo Techniques," IZA Discussion Papers 1251, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  8. Troske, Kenneth & Voicu, Alexandru, 2009. "The Effect of the Timing and Spacing of Births on the Level of Labor Market Involvement of Married Women," IZA Discussion Papers 4417, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  9. Amin, Shahina, 2004. "Ethnic differences and married women's employment in Malaysia: do government policies matter?," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 33(3), pages 291-306, July.

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