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Parental Education and Investment in Children's Human Capital in Rural China

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  • Brown, Philip H

Abstract

Numerous empirical studies from developing countries have noted that parental education has a robust and positive effect on child learning, a result that is often attributed to more educated parents making greater investments in their children's human capital. However, the nature of any such investment has not been well understood. This study examines how parental education affects various parental investments in goods and time used in children's human capital production via an unusually detailed survey from rural China. It is found that more educated parents make greater educational investments in both goods and time and that these relationships are generally robust to a rich set of controls. Evidence suggests that making greater investments in both goods and time stems both from higher expected returns to education for children and from different preferences for education among more educated parents. A second key finding is that the marginal effect of mother's education on educational investments is generally larger than that of father's education.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by University of Chicago Press in its journal Economic Development and Cultural Change.

Volume (Year): 54 (2006)
Issue (Month): 4 (July)
Pages: 759-89

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Handle: RePEc:ucp:ecdecc:y:2006:v:54:i:4:p:759-89

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Web page: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/EDCC/

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Cited by:
  1. Feng Hu, 2013. "Does migration benefit the schooling of children left behind?," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 29(2), pages 33-70, July.
  2. Chad Meyerhoefer & C. Chen, 2011. "The effect of parental labor migration on children’s educational progress in rural china," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, Springer, vol. 9(3), pages 379-396, September.
  3. Tharmmapornphilas, Rubkwan, 2013. "Impact of household factors on youth's school decisions in Thailand," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 258-272.
  4. Debasis Bandyopadhyay & Xueli Tang, 2011. "Parental nurturing and adverse effects of redistribution," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, Springer, vol. 16(1), pages 71-98, March.
  5. Paul Frijters & Luo Chuliang & Xin Meng, 2012. "Child Education and the Family Income Gradient in China," Discussion Papers Series 470, School of Economics, University of Queensland, Australia.
  6. Yuanyuan Chen & Shuaizhang Feng, 2011. "Parental education and wages: Evidence from China," Frontiers of Economics in China, Springer, Springer, vol. 6(4), pages 568-591, December.
  7. L. Guarcello & I. Kovrova & F. C. Rosati, 2008. "Child labour as a response to shocks: evidence from Cambodian villages," UCW Working Paper, Understanding Children's Work (UCW Programme) 37, Understanding Children's Work (UCW Programme).
  8. Majlesi, Kaveh, 2014. "Demand for Low-Skilled Labor and Parental Investment in Children's Education: Evidence from Mexico," Working Papers, Lund University, Department of Economics 2014:5, Lund University, Department of Economics.

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