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Post-College Schooling, Overeducation, and Hourly Earnings in the United States

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  • Stephen Rubb

Abstract

Using 1990 US census data, the present paper examines the relationship between overeducation and earnings. The paper updates previous findings and then focuses on those most likely to be overeducated--individuals with post-college schooling. It is hypothesized that specific occupations that require college education may be flexible in their ability to utilize the surplus human capital of the employees. Being overeducated is shown to increase the wages of men working at a job that requires a bachelor's degree. The results are compared with findings in Canada and the UK. Additionally, overeducation is shown to contribute to the gender wage gap.

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File URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/09645290210127453
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Education Economics.

Volume (Year): 11 (2003)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 53-72

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Handle: RePEc:taf:edecon:v:11:y:2003:i:1:p:53-72

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Cited by:
  1. Chiswick, Barry R. & Miller, Paul W., 2010. "Educational Mismatch: Are High-Skilled Immigrants Really Working at High-Skilled Jobs and the Price They Pay if They Aren’t?," SULCIS Working Papers 2010:7, Stockholm University Linnaeus Center for Integration Studies - SULCIS.
  2. Gianni Betti & Antonella D’Agostino & Laura Neri, 2011. "Educational Mismatch of Graduates: a Multidimensional and Fuzzy Indicator," Social Indicators Research, Springer, vol. 103(3), pages 465-480, September.
  3. Karoly Fazekas & Gabor Kezdi (ed.), 2007. "The Hungarian Labour Market 2007," The Hungarian Labour Market Yearbooks, Institute of Economics, Centre for Economic and Regional Studies, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, number 2007, January.
  4. Guironnet, J.-P. & Peypoch, N., 2007. "Human capital allocation and overeducation: A measure of French productivity (1987, 1999)," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 24(3), pages 398-410, May.
  5. Tsai, Yuping, 2010. "Returns to overeducation: A longitudinal analysis of the U.S. labor market," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(4), pages 606-617, August.
  6. Alma Espino, 2011. "Evaluación de los desajustes entre oferta y demanda laboral por calificaciones en el mercado laboral de Uruguay," REVISTA DE ECONOMÍA DEL ROSARIO, UNIVERSIDAD DEL ROSARIO.
  7. Chiswick, Barry R. & Miller, Paul W., 2010. "Does the choice of reference levels of education matter in the ORU earnings equation?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(6), pages 1076-1085, December.
  8. Barros, Carlos P. & Guironnet, Jean-Pascal & Peypoch, Nicolas, 2011. "Productivity growth and biased technical change in French higher education," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 641-646.
  9. Jean-Pascal Guironnet & Nicolas Peypoch, 2005. "Human Capital Allocation and Overeducation: A Measure of French Productivity," Working Papers 05-10, LAMETA, Universtiy of Montpellier, revised Oct 2005.
  10. Peter Galasi, 2008. "The effect of educational mismatch on wages for 25 countries," Budapest Working Papers on the Labour Market 0808, Institute of Economics, Centre for Economic and Regional Studies, Hungarian Academy of Sciences.

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