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Technology Flows Matrix Estimation Revisited

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  • Frederic Scherer
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    Abstract

    This paper revisits the methodological problems of estimating matrices showing how technological advances--measured by industry research and development outlays--flow from industries of origin to using industries. An early effort relied upon the analysis of 15 112 US patents. Several alternative methods are explored to address methodological questions concerning the choice of carrier matrices, the handling of diagonal elements, and the treatment of capital goods flows. Technology flow matrices estimated using diverse combinations of assumptions are tested for goodness-of-fit relative to the original patent-based matrix and for their ability to "predict' productivity growth in Solowian regression equations. Although some anomalies emerge, the best results are obtained using combined first-order transactions and capital flows matrices with diagonal elements adjusted to reflect the ratio of internal process to all R&D spending. However, flow data compiled using the Leontief inverse matrix add explanatory power in productivity growth regressions.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Economic Systems Research.

    Volume (Year): 15 (2003)
    Issue (Month): 3 ()
    Pages: 327-358

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    Handle: RePEc:taf:ecsysr:v:15:y:2003:i:3:p:327-358

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    Related research

    Keywords: Productivity Growth; Technology; Research And Development;

    References

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    1. Dale W. Jorgenson & Kevin J. Stiroh, 2000. "Raising the Speed Limit: US Economic Growth in the Information Age," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 261, OECD Publishing.
    2. Kenneth Arrow, 1962. "Economic Welfare and the Allocation of Resources for Invention," NBER Chapters, in: The Rate and Direction of Inventive Activity: Economic and Social Factors, pages 609-626 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Adam B. Jaffe & Manuel Trajtenberg, 2005. "Patents, Citations, and Innovations: A Window on the Knowledge Economy," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 026260065x, December.
    4. Samuel Kortum & Jonathan Putnam, 1997. "Assigning Patents to Industries: Tests of the Yale Technology Concordance," Economic Systems Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 9(2), pages 161-176.
    5. Dietmar Harhoff, 1996. "Strategic Spillovers and Incentives for Research and Development," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 42(6), pages 907-925, June.
    6. Scherer, F M, 1982. "Inter-Industry Technology Flows and Productivity Growth," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 64(4), pages 627-34, November.
    7. Mansfield, Edwin, et al, 1977. "Social and Private Rates of Return from Industrial Innovations," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 91(2), pages 221-40, May.
    8. repec:fth:harver:1487 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Robert Evenson & Daniel Johnson, 1997. "Introduction: Invention Input-Output Analysis," Economic Systems Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 9(2), pages 149-160.
    10. Daniel Johnson & Robert Evenson, 1997. "Innovation and Invention in Canada," Economic Systems Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 9(2), pages 177-192.
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    Cited by:
    1. Giovanni Cerulli & Bianca Potì, 2007. "Measuring Intersectoral Knowledge Spillovers: an Application of Sensitivity Analysis to Italy," CERIS Working Paper 200711, Institute for Economic Research on Firms and Growth - Moncalieri (TO).
    2. Peilei Fan, 2011. "Innovation capacity and economic development: China and India," Economic Change and Restructuring, Springer, vol. 44(1), pages 49-73, April.

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