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Differentiation in black education

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Author Info

  • Servaas van der Berg
  • Louise Wood
  • Neil le Roux

Abstract

Based on a graphical and statistical analysis of 1993 survey data, this article shows that educational inequalities among black school-age children were substantial and systematically associated with socio-economic status. Children of more affluent, better educated and metropolitan parents progressed better in schools, thus attaining higher levels of education, and also outperformed others who had progressed as far in terms of cognitive outcomes (measured by literacy and numeracy test scores). Thus, educational inequalities may become enduring, as the ability to benefit from education is usually transmitted across generations (better educated individuals obtain better jobs, and their children are again better educated). The abysmal educational quality of the largest part of the school system therefore has to be improved drastically, to allow poor children to overcome their socio-economic deficits and to benefit from education.

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File URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/03768350220132495
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Development Southern Africa.

Volume (Year): 19 (2002)
Issue (Month): 2 ()
Pages: 289-306

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Handle: RePEc:taf:deveza:v:19:y:2002:i:2:p:289-306

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Cited by:
  1. Mia de Vos, 2011. "Quantitative and qualitative aspects of education in South Africa: An analysis using the National Income Dynamic Study," Working Papers 06/2011, Stellenbosch University, Department of Economics.
  2. Cobus Burger & Servaas van der Berg, 2011. "Modelling cognitive skills, ability and school quality to explain labour market earnings differentials," Working Papers 08/2011, Stellenbosch University, Department of Economics.
  3. Ronelle Burger & Servaas van der Berg, 2003. "Education and Socio-Economic Differentials: A Study of School Performance in the Western Cape," Working Papers 03073, University of Cape Town, Development Policy Research Unit.
  4. Doubell Chamberlain & Servaas van der Berg, 2002. "Earnings functions, labour market discrimination and quality of education in South Africa," Working Papers 02/2002, Stellenbosch University, Department of Economics.

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