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The welfare costs of corruption

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  • Heinz Welsch

Abstract

Corruption has been shown to affect a variety of economic indicators, especially GDP per capita. However, as GDP is not a genuine indicator of welfare, it may reflect the welfare costs of corruption only in an incomplete way. This article uses self-rated subjective well-being as an empirical approximation to general welfare and shows that cross-national welfare - operationalized in this way - is affected by corruption not only indirectly through GDP, but also directly through nonmaterial factors. This article estimates the size of these effects as well as their monetary equivalent. The direct effect - not previously investigated in the corruption literature - is found to be substantially larger than the indirect effect.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Applied Economics.

Volume (Year): 40 (2008)
Issue (Month): 14 ()
Pages: 1839-1849

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Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:40:y:2008:i:14:p:1839-1849

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Cited by:
  1. Beja Jr., Edsel L., 2011. "Subjective Well-Being Approach to the Valuation of International Development: Evidence for the Millennium Development Goals," MPRA Paper 27865, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  2. Andrés Rodríguez-Pose & Kristina Maslauskaite, 2011. "Can policy make us happier? Individual characteristics, socioeconomic factors, and life satisfaction in Central and Eastern Europe," Working Papers 2011-19, Instituto Madrileño de Estudios Avanzados (IMDEA) Ciencias Sociales.
  3. Friedel Bolle & Claudia Vogel, 2011. "Power comes with responsibility—or does it?," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 148(3), pages 459-470, September.
  4. Welsch, Heinz, 2009. "Implications of happiness research for environmental economics," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(11), pages 2735-2742, September.
  5. Katrin Rehdanz & Heinz Welsch & Daiju Narita & Toshihiro Okubo, 2013. "Well-being effects of a major negative externality: The case of Fukushima," Kiel Working Papers 1855, Kiel Institute for the World Economy.
  6. Carmelo León & Jorge Araña & Javier León, 2013. "Correcting for Scale Perception Bias in Measuring Corruption: an Application to Chile and Spain," Social Indicators Research, Springer, vol. 114(3), pages 977-995, December.
  7. Heinz Welsch & Philipp Biermann, 2013. "Electricity Supply Preferences in Europe: Evidence from Subjective Well-Being Data," Working Papers V-359-13, University of Oldenburg, Department of Economics, revised Aug 2013.
  8. Peerayuth Charoensukmongkol & Murad Moqbel, 2014. "Does Investment in ICT Curb or Create More Corruption? A Cross-Country Analysis," Public Organization Review, Springer, vol. 14(1), pages 51-63, March.
  9. Alexandra Nonnenmacher & Jürgen Friedrichs, 2013. "The Missing Link: Deficits of Country-Level Studies. A Review of 22 Articles Explaining Life Satisfaction," Social Indicators Research, Springer, vol. 110(3), pages 1221-1244, February.
  10. Paul Dolan & Daniel Fujiwara & Robert Metcalfe, 2011. "A Step towards Valuing Utility the Marginal and Cardinal Way," CEP Discussion Papers dp1062, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.

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