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Applying conjoint analysis in economic evaluations: an application to menorrhagia

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  • Fernando San Miguel
  • Mandy Ryan
  • Emma McIntosh
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    Abstract

    The increased demand for health care, coupled with limited resources, means that decisions have to be made concerning the allocation of scarce health care resources. This paper considers how conjoint analysis (CA) can be used to aid this decision making process. It is shown how the technique can be used to estimate marginal rates of substitution between attributes, willingness to pay (WTP) if cost is included as an attribute and overall utility scores for different ways of providing a service. The technique is applied to consider women's preferences for two surgical procedures in the treatment of menorrhagia: hysterectomy and conservative surgery. The results suggest conservative surgery is preferred to hysterectomy, as indicated by higher utility scores for the former and a marginal WTP of 7593 to have conservative surgery rather than hysterectomy. The internal validity of CA was also shown. It is concluded that CA is a potentially useful instrument for policy makers. However, numerous methodological issues need addressing before the technique becomes an established instrument within economic evaluations.

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    File URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/000368400322165
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Applied Economics.

    Volume (Year): 32 (2000)
    Issue (Month): 7 ()
    Pages: 823-833

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    Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:32:y:2000:i:7:p:823-833

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    Cited by:
    1. Scott, Anthony, 2002. "Identifying and analysing dominant preferences in discrete choice experiments: An application in health care," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 23(3), pages 383-398, June.
    2. Yeonbae Kim & Jeong-Dong Lee & Daeyoung Koh, 2005. "Effects of consumer preferences on the convergence of mobile telecommunications devices," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(7), pages 817-826.
    3. Giebel, Olaf & Breitschopf, Barbara, 2011. "The impact of policy elements on the financing costs of RE investment: The case of wind power in Germany," Working Papers "Sustainability and Innovation" S11/2011, Fraunhofer Institute for Systems and Innovation Research (ISI).
    4. Patrizia Riganti & Anna Alberini & Alberto Longo, 2005. "Public Preferences for Land uses’ changes - valuing urban regeneration projects at the Venice Arsenale," ERSA conference papers ersa05p756, European Regional Science Association.
    5. Stirling Bryan & Paul Dolan, 2004. "Discrete choice experiments in health economics," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer, vol. 5(3), pages 199-202, September.
    6. Daniele Fabbri & Chiara Monfardini, 2008. "Style of practice and assortative mating: a recursive probit analysis of Caesarean section scheduling in Italy," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 40(11), pages 1411-1423.
    7. Yusuke Sakata & Junyi Shen & Yoshizo Hashimoto, 2006. "The Influence of Environmental Deterioration and Network Improvement on Transport Modal Choice," Discussion Papers in Economics and Business 06-04, Osaka University, Graduate School of Economics and Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP).
    8. Debby van Helvoort-Postulart & Benedict G. C. Dellaert & Trudy van der Weijden & Maarten F. von Meyenfeldt & Carmen D. Dirksen, 2009. "Discrete choice experiments for complex health-care decisions: does hierarchical information integration offer a solution?," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(8), pages 903-920.
    9. Emily Lancsar & Elizabeth Savage, 2004. "Deriving welfare measures from discrete choice experiments: inconsistency between current methods and random utility and welfare theory," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 13(9), pages 901-907.
    10. Patterson, Paul M. & Martinez, Samuel Cardona, 2004. "State and Origin Branding in Hispanic Food Markets," Journal of Food Distribution Research, Food Distribution Research Society, vol. 35(03), November.

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