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Subjective Wellbeing as an Affective-Cognitive Construct

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Author Info

  • Melanie Davern
  • Robert Cummins

    ()

  • Mark Stokes
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    Abstract

    No abstract is available for this item.

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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s10902-007-9066-1
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Springer in its journal Journal of Happiness Studies.

    Volume (Year): 8 (2007)
    Issue (Month): 4 (December)
    Pages: 429-449

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    Handle: RePEc:spr:jhappi:v:8:y:2007:i:4:p:429-449

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    Web page: http://www.springerlink.com/content/1389-4978

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    Web: http://link.springer.de/orders.htm

    Related research

    Keywords: Subjective wellbeing; Core affect; Life satisfaction; Homeostasis; Personality;

    References

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
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    1. Robert Cummins, 2000. "Personal Income and Subjective Well-being: A Review," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 1(2), pages 133-158, June.
    2. Peter Man, 1991. "The influence of peers and parents on youth life satisfaction in Hong Kong," Social Indicators Research, Springer, vol. 24(4), pages 347-365, June.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
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    Cited by:
    1. Cahit Guven & Claudia Senik & Holger Stichnoth, 2011. "You can't be happier than your wife. Happiness Gaps and Divorce," PSE Working Papers halshs-00555427, HAL.
    2. von Scheve, Christian & Esche, Frederike & Schupp, Jürgen, 2013. "The Emotional Timeline of Unemployment: Anticipation, Reaction, and Adaptation," IZA Discussion Papers 7654, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Adrian Tomyn & Matthew Fuller Tyszkiewicz & Jacolyn Norrish, 2014. "The Psychometric Equivalence of the Personal Wellbeing Index School-Children for Indigenous and Non-Indigenous Australian Adolescents," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 15(1), pages 43-56, February.
    4. Robert Cummins & Mark Wooden, 2014. "Personal Resilience in Times of Crisis: The Implications of SWB Homeostasis and Set-Points," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 15(1), pages 223-235, February.
    5. S. Quadros-Wander & J. McGillivray & J. Broadbent, 2014. "The influence of perceived control on subjective wellbeing in later life," Social Indicators Research, Springer, vol. 115(3), pages 999-1010, February.
    6. Alex Michalos & P. Kahlke, 2010. "Arts and the Perceived Quality of Life in British Columbia," Social Indicators Research, Springer, vol. 96(1), pages 1-39, March.
    7. Leonardo Becchetti & Stefano Castriota & Nazaria Solferino, 2011. "Development Projects and Life Satisfaction: An Impact Study on Fair Trade Handicraft Producers," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 12(1), pages 115-138, March.
    8. Lufanna Lai & Robert Cummins, 2013. "The Contribution of Job and Partner Satisfaction to the Homeostatic Defense of Subjective Wellbeing," Social Indicators Research, Springer, vol. 111(1), pages 203-217, March.
    9. Daniela Wilks & Félix Neto, 2013. "Workplace Well-being, Gender and Age: Examining the ‘Double Jeopardy’ Effect," Social Indicators Research, Springer, vol. 114(3), pages 875-890, December.
    10. Jed Blore & Mark Stokes & David Mellor & Lucy Firth & Robert Cummins, 2011. "Comparing Multiple Discrepancies Theory to Affective Models of Subjective Wellbeing," Social Indicators Research, Springer, vol. 100(1), pages 1-16, January.
    11. Ekaterina Uglanova & Ursula Staudinger, 2013. "Zooming in on Life Events: Is Hedonic Adaptation Sensitive to the Temporal Distance from the Event?," Social Indicators Research, Springer, vol. 111(1), pages 265-286, March.
    12. Adrian Tomyn & Robert Cummins, 2011. "The Subjective Wellbeing of High-School Students: Validating the Personal Wellbeing Index—School Children," Social Indicators Research, Springer, vol. 101(3), pages 405-418, May.
    13. Adrian Tomyn & Jacolyn Norrish & Robert Cummins, 2013. "The Subjective Wellbeing of Indigenous Australian Adolescents: Validating the Personal Wellbeing Index-School Children," Social Indicators Research, Springer, vol. 110(3), pages 1013-1031, February.
    14. Robert Cummins & Ning Li & Mark Wooden & Mark Stokes, 2014. "A Demonstration of Set-Points for Subjective Wellbeing," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 15(1), pages 183-206, February.
    15. Kathryn Page & Dianne Vella-Brodrick, 2009. "The ‘What’, ‘Why’ and ‘How’ of Employee Well-Being: A New Model," Social Indicators Research, Springer, vol. 90(3), pages 441-458, February.
    16. Seth Kaplan & Joseph Luchman & Landon Mock, 2013. "General and Specific Question Sequence Effects in Satisfaction Surveys: Integrating Directional and Correlational Effects," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 14(5), pages 1443-1458, October.
    17. Mònica González & Germà Coenders & Marc Saez & Ferran Casas, 2010. "Non-linearity, Complexity and Limited Measurement in the Relationship Between Satisfaction with Specific Life Domains and Satisfaction with Life as a Whole," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 11(3), pages 335-352, June.
    18. William Magee & Sébastien St-Arnaud, 2012. "Models of the Joint Structure of Domain-Related and Global Distress: Implications for the Reconciliation of Quality of Life and Mental Health Perspectives," Social Indicators Research, Springer, vol. 105(1), pages 161-185, January.
    19. Michael Busseri & Stan Sadava, 2013. "Subjective Well-Being as a Dynamic and Agentic System: Evidence from a Longitudinal Study," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 14(4), pages 1085-1112, August.
    20. Adrian Tomyn & Matthew Fuller Tyszkiewicz & Robert Cummins, 2013. "The Personal Wellbeing Index: Psychometric Equivalence for Adults and School Children," Social Indicators Research, Springer, vol. 110(3), pages 913-924, February.

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