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Child care availability and first-birth timing in Norway

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  • Ronald Rindfuss

    ()

  • David Guilkey
  • S. Morgan
  • Øystein Kravdal
  • Karen Guzzo
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    Abstract

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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1353/dem.2007.0017
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Springer in its journal Demography.

    Volume (Year): 44 (2007)
    Issue (Month): 2 (May)
    Pages: 345-372

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    Handle: RePEc:spr:demogr:v:44:y:2007:i:2:p:345-372

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    Web page: http://www.springer.com/economics/journal/13524

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    References

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    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
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    1. Anne H. Gauthier, 2002. "Family Policies in Industrialized Countries: Is There Convergence?," Population (english edition), Institut National d'Études Démographiques (INED), vol. 57(3), pages 447-474.
    2. Bettio, Francesca & Villa, Paola, 1998. "A Mediterranean Perspective on the Breakdown of the Relationship between Participation and Fertility," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 22(2), pages 137-71, March.
    3. Bogart, William T. & Cromwell, Brian A., 1997. "How Much More is a Good School District Worth?," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association, vol. 50(2), pages 215-32, June.
    4. Sandra E. Black, 1997. "Do better schools matter? Parental valuation of elementary education," Research Paper 9729, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
    5. Hans-Peter Kohler & Francesco C. Billari & José Antonio Ortega, 2002. "The Emergence of Lowest-Low Fertility in Europe During the 1990s," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 28(4), pages 641-680.
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    Cited by:
    1. Anna Matysiak & Dorota Wêziak-Bia³owolska, 2013. "Country-Specific Conditions for Work and Family Reconciliation: An Attempt at Quantification," Working Papers 67, Institute of Statistics and Demography, Warsaw School of Economics.
    2. Pau Baizan, 2009. "Regional child care availability and fertility decisions in Spain," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 21(27), pages 803-842, December.
    3. Øystein Kravdal, 2010. "Demographers’ interest in fertility trends and determinants in developed countries: Is it warranted?," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 22(22), pages 663-690, April.
    4. Marit Rønsen & Kari Skrede, 2010. "Can public policies sustain fertility in the Nordic countries?," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 22(13), pages 321-346, March.
    5. Gunnar Andersson, 2008. "A review of policies and practices related to the 'highest-low' fertility of Sweden," Vienna Yearbook of Population Research, Vienna Institute of Demography (VID) of the Austrian Academy of Sciences in Vienna, vol. 6(1), pages 89-102.
    6. Jan M. Hoem, 2008. "Overview Chapter 8: The impact of public policies on European fertility," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 19(10), pages 249-260, July.
    7. Jennifer Kane & S. Morgan & Kathleen Harris & David Guilkey, 2013. "The Educational Consequences of Teen Childbearing," Demography, Springer, vol. 50(6), pages 2129-2150, December.
    8. Anna Baranowska-Rataj & Anna Matysiak, 2012. "Czy znamy lekarstwo na nisk¹ dzietnoœæ? Wyniki miêdzynarodowych badañ ewaluacyjnych na temat polityki rodzinnej," Working Papers 47, Institute of Statistics and Demography, Warsaw School of Economics.
    9. Øystein Kravdal, 2008. "Does income inequality really influence individual mortality?," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 18(7), pages 205-232, April.
    10. Sandra Krapf, 2009. "Childcare and family ideology in Sweden," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2009-044, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    11. Maria Alessandra Antonelli & Veronica Grembi, 2014. "Central Targets and local Agendas: Missing Lisbon 2010," Public Finance Research Papers 6, Istituto di Economia e Finanza, DIGEF, Sapienza University of Rome.
    12. Eliane El Badaoui & Eleonora Matteazzi, 2014. "To be a Mother, or not to be? Career and Wage Ladder in Italy and the UK," EconomiX Working Papers 2014-30, University of Paris West - Nanterre la Défense, EconomiX.
    13. Marit Rønsen & Kari Skrede, 2008. "Fertility trends and differentials in the Nordic countries - Footprints of welfare policies and challenges on the road ahead," Vienna Yearbook of Population Research, Vienna Institute of Demography (VID) of the Austrian Academy of Sciences in Vienna, vol. 6(1), pages 103-123.
    14. Jan Van Bavel & Joanna Rózanska-Putek, 2010. "Second birth rates across Europe: interactions between women’s level of education and child care enrolment," Vienna Yearbook of Population Research, Vienna Institute of Demography (VID) of the Austrian Academy of Sciences in Vienna, vol. 8(1), pages 107-138.
    15. Paul Mathews & Rebecca Sear, 2013. "Does the kin orientation of a British woman’s social network influence her entry into motherhood?," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 28(11), pages 313-340, February.
    16. Sebastian Klüsener, 2009. "An alternative framework for studying the effects of family policies on fertility in the absence of individual-level data: a spatial analysis with small-scale macro data on Germany," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2009-027, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    17. Joanna Osiñska, 2013. "Postawy wzglêdem euro i ich determinanty– przegl¹d badañ i literatury przedmiotu," Working Papers 70, Institute of Statistics and Demography, Warsaw School of Economics.
    18. Trude Lappegård, 2008. "Family Policies and Fertility: Parents' Parental Leave Use, Childcare Availability, the Introduction of Childcare Cash Benefit and Continued Childbearing in Norway," Discussion Papers 564, Research Department of Statistics Norway.
    19. Sarah Brauner-Otto, 2013. "Attitudes About Children and Fertility Limitation Behavior," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer, vol. 32(1), pages 1-24, February.

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