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Marital wage gap

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  • Aistov, Andrey

    ()
    (National Research University Higher School of Economics (Nizhnii Novgorod) Russia)

Abstract

In the paper relationship of men’s income and their marital status is tested empirically. The Russia Longitudinal Monitoring Survey of HSE (RLMS HSE) data (1994–2011) confirm that men who are officially or civil married and were married before earn more in average than men who are not and were not married. This is explained by hypotheses of selection and treatment. The hypotheses are tested by the Mincerian type equations estimates. The using data do not reject the hypotheses.

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File URL: http://pe.cemi.rssi.ru/pe_2013_3_99-114.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS" in its journal Applied Econometrics.

Volume (Year): 31 (2013)
Issue (Month): 3 ()
Pages: 99-114

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Handle: RePEc:ris:apltrx:0218

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Web page: http://appliedeconometrics.cemi.rssi.ru/

Related research

Keywords: marital status; marital wage gap; mens income; selection; treatment; RLMS HSE; panel data; distributed fixed effect;

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  1. Harry A. Krashinsky, 2004. "Do Marital Status and Computer Usage Really Change the Wage Structure?," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 39(3).
  2. Christopher Dougherty, 2006. "The Marriage Earnings Premium as a Distributed Fixed Effect," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 41(2).
  3. Elena Bardasi & Mark Taylor, 2008. "Marriage and Wages: A Test of the Specialization Hypothesis," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 75(299), pages 569-591, 08.
  4. Becker, Gary S, 1973. "A Theory of Marriage: Part I," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 81(4), pages 813-46, July-Aug..
  5. Joni Hersch & Leslie S. Stratton, 2000. "Household specialization and the male marriage wage premium," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 54(1), pages 78-94, October.
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