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Monetary Disequilibrium in the Theory of Endogenous Money

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  • Jan Korda
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    Abstract

    The article deals with monetary disequilibrium in the theory of endogenous money. In new consensus economics, monetary disequilibrium is not considered whereas money is endogenous and passive. In post-Keynesian economics, there is an explicit discussion about reconciliation of money demand and supply. Based on careful distinction between money and credit markets, it is argued that monetary disequilibrium can occur even when money is endogenous and therefore money is endogenous and active. This is because of insufficiency of reflux mechanism. The article suggests ways in which new consensus should be supplemented to incorporate this issue. This is also important for monetary policy otherwise a part of transmission mechanism is left out.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by University of Economics, Prague in its journal Politická ekonomie.

    Volume (Year): 2011 (2011)
    Issue (Month): 5 ()
    Pages: 680-705

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    Handle: RePEc:prg:jnlpol:v:2011:y:2011:i:5:id:814:p:680-705

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    Related research

    Keywords: reflux mechanism; Post-Keynesian economics; new consensus economics; monetary disequilibrium; endogenous money;

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    References

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    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
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    14. Lavoie, Marc, 1999. "The Credit-Led Supply of Deposits and the Demand for Money: Kaldor's Reflux Mechanism as Previously Endorsed by Joan Robinson," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 23(1), pages 103-13, January.
    15. Thomas I. Palley, 1991. "The Endogenous Money Supply: Consensus and Disagreement," Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, M.E. Sharpe, Inc., vol. 13(3), pages 397-403, April.
    16. Arestis, Philip & Howells, Peter, 1999. "The Supply of Credit Money and the Demand for Deposits: A Reply," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 23(1), pages 115-19, January.
    17. Charles Goodhart, 1989. "Has Moore Become too Horizontal?," Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, M.E. Sharpe, Inc., vol. 12(1), pages 29-34, October.
    18. Cottrell, Allin, 1994. "Post-Keynesian Monetary Economics," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 18(6), pages 587-605, December.
    19. Arestis, Philip & Howells, Peter, 1996. "Theoretical Reflections on Endogenous Money: The Problem with 'Convenience Lending.'," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 20(5), pages 539-51, September.
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    22. Marc Lavoie, 2006. "A Post-Keynesian Amendment To The New Consensus On Monetary Policy," Metroeconomica, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 57(2), pages 165-192, 05.
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