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A Model of Labour Productivity and Union Density in British Private Sector Unionised Establishments

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  • Moreton, David
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    Abstract

    In this paper, a micro theoretic model of the simultaneous determination of labor productivity and union density is developed and estimated using British establishment-level data from the 1990 Workplace Employee Relations Survey. The main empirical finding is that higher union bargaining power does not necessarily lower labor productivity in union firms, ceteris paribus. Separate bargaining by multiple unions has a negative effect but productivity is higher if management recommends union membership. There is also evidence that, if unions can more effectively provide services to their members and secure management support for union membership, union density may recover. Copyright 1999 by Royal Economic Society.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Oxford University Press in its journal Oxford Economic Papers.

    Volume (Year): 51 (1999)
    Issue (Month): 2 (April)
    Pages: 322-44

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    Handle: RePEc:oup:oxecpp:v:51:y:1999:i:2:p:322-44

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    Cited by:
    1. Goerke, Laszlo & Pannenberg, Markus, 2007. "Trade union membership and work councils in West Germany," Tübinger Diskussionsbeiträge 311, University of Tübingen, School of Business and Economics.
    2. Andrea Vaona, 2006. "The Duration of Union Membership: an Empirical Study," Kiel Working Papers 1268, Kiel Institute for the World Economy.
    3. Alex Bryson, 2001. "Union effects on managerial and employee perceptions of employee relations in Britain," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 4957, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    4. Goerke, Laszlo & Pannenberg, Markus, 2003. "Norm-Based Trade Union Membership: Evidence for Germany," IZA Discussion Papers 962, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Laszlo Goerke & Markus Pannenberg, 2012. "Risk Aversion and Trade-Union Membership," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 114(2), pages 275-295, 06.
    6. Goerke, Laszlo & Pannenberg, Markus, 2010. "Trade Union Membership and Dismissals," IZA Discussion Papers 5222, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    7. Alex Bryson & David Wilkinson, 2002. "Collective bargaining and workplace performance: an investigation using the workplace employee relations survey 1998," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 4995, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    8. Alex Bryson, 2006. "Union Free-Riding in Britain and New Zealand," CEP Discussion Papers dp0713, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    9. Schnabel, Claus & Wagner, Joachim, 2003. "Determinants of Trade Union Membership in Western Germany: Evidence from Micro Data, 1980-2000," IZA Discussion Papers 708, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    10. Schnabel, Claus, 2002. "Determinants of trade union membership," Discussion Papers 15, Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Chair of Labour and Regional Economics.

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