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The Influence of Classroom Characteristics on High School Teacher Turnover

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  • Mont, Daniel
  • Rees, Daniel I

Abstract

This paper examines the effect of class load and other factors on teacher turnover. Unlike previous studies, class load characteristics--class size, number of classes taught, and percentage of class time spent in areas outside a teacher's certification area--are included along with salary, personal characteristics, and district characteristics in a discrete time hazard model to simulate the effects of changing classroom characteristics on high school teacher turnover. The results indicate that class load characteristics are important correlates of job turnover. Policy implications for school districts, given a growing school-age population, are discussed. Copyright 1996 by Oxford University Press.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Western Economic Association International in its journal Economic Inquiry.

Volume (Year): 34 (1996)
Issue (Month): 1 (January)
Pages: 152-67

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Handle: RePEc:oup:ecinqu:v:34:y:1996:i:1:p:152-67

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Cited by:
  1. Jones, Michael D., 2013. "Teacher behavior under performance pay incentives," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 148-164.
  2. Arnaud Chevalier & Peter Dolton & Steven Mcintosh, 2007. "Recruiting and Retaining Teachers in the UK: An Analysis of Graduate Occupation Choice from the 1960s to the 1990s," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 74(293), pages 69-96, 02.
  3. Stuit, David A. & Smith, Thomas M., 2012. "Explaining the gap in charter and traditional public school teacher turnover rates," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 31(2), pages 268-279.
  4. Charles T. Clotfelter & Helen F. Ladd & Jacob L. Vigdor, 2006. "Teacher-Student Matching and the Assessment of Teacher Effectiveness," NBER Working Papers 11936, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Donald Boyd & Hamilton Lankford & Susanna Loeb & James Wyckoff, 2003. "Analyzing the Determinants of the Matching Public School Teachers to Jobs: Estimating Compensating Differentials in Imperfect Labor Markets," NBER Working Papers 9878, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Torberg Falch & Bjarne Strøm, 2003. "Teacher Turnover and Non-Pecuniary Factors," Working Paper Series 3604, Department of Economics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology.
  7. Guarino, Cassandra M. & Brown, Abigail B. & Wyse, Adam E., 2011. "Can districts keep good teachers in the schools that need them most?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(5), pages 962-979, October.
  8. Benjamin Scafidi & David L. Sjoquist & Todd R. Stinebrickner, 2005. "Race, Poverty, and Teacher Mobility," University of Western Ontario, CIBC Centre for Human Capital and Productivity Working Papers 20053, University of Western Ontario, CIBC Centre for Human Capital and Productivity.
  9. Stinebrickner, Todd R., 1998. "An Empirical Investigation of Teacher Attrition," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 17(2), pages 127-136, April.
  10. Imazeki, Jennifer, 2005. "Teacher salaries and teacher attrition," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 24(4), pages 431-449, August.
  11. Andersson, Christian & Waldenström, Nina, 2007. "Teacher supply and the market for teachers," Working Paper Series 2007:5, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
  12. Feng, Li, 2005. "Hire Today, Gone Tomorrow: The Determinants of Attrition among Public School Teachers," MPRA Paper 589, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  13. Clotfelter, Charles T. & Ladd, Helen F. & Vigdor, Jacob, 2005. "Who teaches whom? Race and the distribution of novice teachers," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 24(4), pages 377-392, August.
  14. Wolter, Stefan C. & Denzler, Stefan, 2003. "Wage Elasticity of the Teacher Supply in Switzerland," IZA Discussion Papers 733, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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