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Empirical evidence on interdependent preferences: nature or nurture?

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  • Daniel John Zizzo

Abstract

This paper discusses empirical evidence for interdependent preferences from the point of view of the neurosciences, of heritability studies, and of cross-cultural and developmental psychology: it shows how interdependent preferences are determined to a significant degree by environmental factors. This result has meaningful implications for economic theory, policy and experimentation. A theory of interdependent preferences should also be a theory of their endogenous determination. Normative analyses ignore the endogeneity of interdependent preferences at their own peril. Caution is required in experimental analyses attempting to measure the distribution of interdependent preferences in the population. Copyright 2003, Oxford University Press.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Oxford University Press in its journal Cambridge Journal of Economics.

Volume (Year): 27 (2003)
Issue (Month): 6 (November)
Pages: 867-880

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Handle: RePEc:oup:cambje:v:27:y:2003:i:6:p:867-880

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Cited by:
  1. Jan Schnellenbach, 2006. "Appeasing nihilists? Some economic thoughts on reducing terrorist activity," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 129(3), pages 301-313, December.
  2. Ramalingam, Abhijit, 2009. ""Endogenous" Relative Concerns: The Impact of Workers' Characteristics on Status and Pro ts in the Firm," MPRA Paper 18759, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  3. Woźny, Łukasz & Garbicz, Marek, 2005. "Taxes and labour supply under interdependent preferences," MPRA Paper 462, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Jun 2005.
  4. Manner, Mikko & Gowdy, John, 2010. "The evolution of social and moral behavior: Evolutionary insights for public policy," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(4), pages 753-761, February.
  5. Joan Costa-i-Font & Frank Cowell, 2013. "Social Identity and Redistributive Preferences: A Survey," CESifo Working Paper Series 4440, CESifo Group Munich.
  6. Tan, Jonathan H.W. & Zizzo, Daniel John, 2008. "Groups, cooperation and conflict in games," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 1-17, February.
  7. Peter Earl & Jason Potts, 2013. "The creative instability hypothesis," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer, vol. 37(2), pages 153-173, May.

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