Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

Does Trading Volume Contain Information to Predict Stock Returns? Evidence from China's Stock Markets

Contents:

Author Info

  • Lee, Cheng F
  • Rui, Oliver M

Abstract

This paper examines empirical contemporaneous and causal relationships between trading volume, stock returns and return volatility in China's four stock exchanges and across these markets. We find that trading volume does not Granger-cause stock market returns on each of the markets. As for the cross-market causal relationship in China's stock markets, there is evidence of a feedback relationship in returns between Shanghai A and Shenzhen B stocks, and between Shanghai B and Shenzhen B stocks. Shanghai B return helps predict the return of Shenzhen A stocks. Shanghai A volume Granger-causes return of Shenzhen B. Shenzhen B volume helps predict the return of Shanghai B stocks. This paper also investigates the causal relationship among these three variables between China's stock markets and the US stock market and between China and Hong Kong. We find that US return helps predict returns of Shanghai A and Shanghai B stocks. US and Hong Kong volumes do not Granger-cause either return or volatility in China's stock markets. In short, information contained in returns, volatility, and volume from financial markets in the US and Hong Kong has very weak predictive power for Chinese financial market variables. Copyright 2000 by Kluwer Academic Publishers

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://journals.kluweronline.com/issn/0924-865X/contents
File Function: link to full text
Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Springer in its journal Review of Quantitative Finance and Accounting.

Volume (Year): 14 (2000)
Issue (Month): 4 (June)
Pages: 341-60

as in new window
Handle: RePEc:kap:rqfnac:v:14:y:2000:i:4:p:341-60

Contact details of provider:
Web page: http://springerlink.metapress.com/link.asp?id=102990

Related research

Keywords:

References

No references listed on IDEAS
You can help add them by filling out this form.

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Goh, Jeremy C. & Jiang, Fuwei & Tu, Jun & Wang, Yuchen, 2013. "Can US economic variables predict the Chinese stock market?," Pacific-Basin Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 22(C), pages 69-87.
  2. Paresh Kumar Narayan & Xinwei Zheng, 2012. "Asymmetric Information and Market Decline: Evidence from the Chinese Market," Review of Pacific Basin Financial Markets and Policies (RPBFMP), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 15(03), pages 1250019-1-1.
  3. Chan, Kam C. & Fung, Hung-Gay & Thapa, Samanta, 2007. "China financial research: A review and synthesis," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 16(3), pages 416-428.
  4. Shyh-Wei Chen, 2008. "Untangling the nexus of stock price and trading volume: evidence from the Chinese stock market," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 7(15), pages 1-16.
  5. Jordan, Steven J. & Vivian, Andrew & Wohar, Mark E., 2014. "Sticky prices or economically-linked economies: The case of forecasting the Chinese stock market," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 95-109.
  6. Cetin Ciner, 2003. "Dynamic Linkages Between Trading Volume and Price Movements: Evidence for Small Firm Stocks," Journal of Entrepreneurial Finance, Pepperdine University, Graziadio School of Business and Management, vol. 8(1), pages 87-102, Spring.
  7. Rodrigo Aranda & Patricio Jaramillo, 2008. "Nonlinear Dynamic in the Chilean Stock Market: Evidence from Returns and Trading Volume," Working Papers Central Bank of Chile 463, Central Bank of Chile.
  8. Wang, Dingyan & Chong, Terence Tai-Leung & Chan, Wing Hong, 2014. "Price Limits and Stock Market Volatility in China," MPRA Paper 54146, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  9. Christos Alexakis, 2011. "Financial Crisis, Ownership Effect and Investors Sentiment: Empirical Evidence from the Banking Sector in Greece," European Research Studies Journal, European Research Studies Journal, vol. 0(3), pages 3-18.
  10. Gebka, Bartosz & Wohar, Mark E., 2013. "Causality between trading volume and returns: Evidence from quantile regressions," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 27(C), pages 144-159.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:kap:rqfnac:v:14:y:2000:i:4:p:341-60. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Guenther Eichhorn) or (Christopher F. Baum).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.