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Islam’s democracy paradox: Muslims claim to like democracy, so why do they have so little?

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Author Info

  • Charles Rowley

    ()

  • Nathanael Smith

    ()

Abstract

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s11127-008-9393-8
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Springer in its journal Public Choice.

Volume (Year): 139 (2009)
Issue (Month): 3 (June)
Pages: 273-299

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Handle: RePEc:kap:pubcho:v:139:y:2009:i:3:p:273-299

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Web page: http://www.springerlink.com/link.asp?id=100332

Related research

Keywords: Islam; Muslim; Culture; Islamic heartland; Islamic democracy deficit; Islamic freedom deficit; Islamic religious freedom deficit;

References

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Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
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  1. Alberto Alesina & Arnaud Devleeschauwer & William Easterly & Sergio Kurlat & Romain Wacziarg, 2002. "Fractionalization," Harvard Institute of Economic Research Working Papers 1959, Harvard - Institute of Economic Research.
    • Wacziarg, Romain & Alesina, Alberto & Devleeschauwer, Arnaud & Easterly, William & Kurlat, Sergio, 2002. "Fractionalization," Research Papers 1744, Stanford University, Graduate School of Business.
    • Alberto Alesina & Arnaud Devleeschauwer & William Easterly & Sergio Kurlat & Romain Wacziarg, 2003. "Fractionalization," NBER Working Papers 9411, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    • Alesina, Alberto & Devleeschauwer, Arnaud & Wacziarg, Romain & Kurlat, Sergio & Easterly, William, 2003. "Fractionalization," Scholarly Articles 4553003, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  2. Peter Bernholz, 2006. "International political system, supreme values and terrorism," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 128(1), pages 221-231, July.
  3. Wintrobe,Ronald, 2000. "The Political Economy of Dictatorship," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521794497, November.
  4. Arye Hillman, 2007. "Economic and security consequences of supreme values," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 131(3), pages 259-280, June.
  5. Michael Munger, 2006. "Preference modification vs. incentive manipulation as tools of terrorist recruitment: The role of culture," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 128(1), pages 131-146, July.
  6. Eli Berman & Laurence R. Iannaccone, 2005. "Religious Extremism: The Good, The Bad, and The Deadly," NBER Working Papers 11663, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Charles K. Rowley, 2004. "Conservatism and Economics: A Sweet Turkish Delight," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 119(1_2), pages 1-12, 04.
  8. Barro, Robert J., 1999. "Determinants of Democracy," Scholarly Articles 3451297, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  9. Laurence R. Iannaccone, 1998. "Introduction to the Economics of Religion," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 36(3), pages 1465-1495, September.
  10. Rowley, Charles K., 2000. "Political culture and economic performance in sub-Saharan Africa," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 16(1), pages 133-158, March.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Cecilia García-Peñalosa & Maty Konte, 2013. "Why Are Women Less Democratic Than Men? Evidence from Sub-Saharan African Countries," Working Papers halshs-00802838, HAL.
  2. Gal Ariely & Eldad Davidov, 2011. "Can we Rate Public Support for Democracy in a Comparable Way? Cross-National Equivalence of Democratic Attitudes in the World Value Survey," Social Indicators Research, Springer, vol. 104(2), pages 271-286, November.
  3. Möller, Marie, 2012. "An empirical study of the limits and perspectives of institutional transfers," CIW Discussion Papers 02/2012, University of Münster, Center for Interdisciplinary Economics (CIW).
  4. Niklas Potrafke, 2010. "Islam and Democracy," Working Paper Series of the Department of Economics, University of Konstanz 2010-10, Department of Economics, University of Konstanz.
  5. Nuri Aras, Osman & Suleymanov, Elchin & Zeynalov, Ayaz, 2012. "Does Oil Income Impede Democratization In Muslim– Majority Countries?," MPRA Paper 52236, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  6. May Elsayyad & Shima'a Hanafy, 2012. "Voting Islamist or Voting secular? An empirical analysis of Voting Outcomes in “Arab Spring” Egypt," MAGKS Papers on Economics 201251, Philipps-Universität Marburg, Faculty of Business Administration and Economics, Department of Economics (Volkswirtschaftliche Abteilung).
  7. Niklas Potrafke, 2012. "Democracy and Countries with Muslim Majorities: A Reply and Update," CESifo Working Paper Series 4039, CESifo Group Munich.
  8. May Elsayyad & Shima’a Hanafy, 2013. "Voting Islamist or Voting secular? An empirical analysis of Voting Outcomes in "Arab Spring" Egypt," Working Papers tax-mpg-rps-2013-01, Max Planck Institute for Tax Law and Public Finance.
  9. Berggren, Niclas & Bjørnskov, Christian, 2012. "Does Religiosity Promote Property Rights and the Rule of Law?," Working Paper Series 905, Research Institute of Industrial Economics.
  10. Cooray, Arusha & Potrafke, Niklas, 2011. "Gender inequality in education: Political institutions or culture and religion?," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 27(2), pages 268-280, June.
  11. Libman, Alexander, 2012. "Перераспределительные Конфликты И Факторы Культуры В Новой Политической Экономии
    [Redistributive Conflicts and Culture in the
    ," MPRA Paper 48192, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  12. Robbert Maseland & André Hoorn, 2011. "Why Muslims like democracy yet have so little of it," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 147(3), pages 481-496, June.
  13. Cecilia García-Peñalosa & Maty Konte, 2013. "Why are Women less Democratic than Men? Evidence from Sub-Saharan African Countries," CESifo Working Paper Series 4524, CESifo Group Munich.
  14. Niklas Potrafke, 2013. "Policies against Human Trafficking: The Role of Religion and Political Institutions," CESifo Working Paper Series 4278, CESifo Group Munich.
  15. Marek Hanusch, 2013. "Islam and democracy: a response," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 154(3), pages 315-321, March.

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