Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

Economic growth and income distribution: linking macro-economic models with household survey data at the global level

Contents:

Author Info

  • Maurizio Bussolo

    ()
    (Latin America and Caribbean Economic Policy, The World Bank, 1818 H Street Washington, DC., USA;)

  • Rafael E De Hoyos

    ()
    (Subsecretaría de Educación Media Superior, Brasil 31, 1er. piso, Edificio SEP Col. Centro México, D.F. 06029;)

  • Denis Medvedev

    ()
    (Latin America and Caribbean Economic Policy, The World Bank, 1818 H Street Washington, DC., USA;)

Abstract

This paper describes in detail the analytical structure of the Global Income Distribution Dynamics (GIDD) model, a global macro-micro modelling framework, and provides some examples of its recent applications. GIDD is the first macro-micro global simulation model focused on long-term, global growth and distribution dynamics. GIDD has been applied in analyzing the effects of multilateral trade liberalization or mitigation of climate change damages, among others. It also explicitly considers long term time horizons during which changes in the demographic structure are crucial components of both growth and distribution dynamics. The challenges of assessing plausible worldwide distributional implications of growth, large shocks, and policy changes are daunting. Although addressing these issues in a macro-micro framework is subject to great uncertainty, a clearly superior alternative is not yet available.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://ima.natsem.canberra.edu.au/IJM/V3_1/IJM_30.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Interational Microsimulation Association in its journal International Journal of Microsimulation.

Volume (Year): 3 (2010)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 92-103

as in new window
Handle: RePEc:ijm:journl:v:3:y:2010:i:1:p:92-103

Contact details of provider:
Web page: http://ima.natsem.canberra.edu.au/index.htm

Related research

Keywords: global income distribution; macro-micro model;

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. François Bourguignon & Francisco H. G. Ferreira & Phillippe G. Leite, 2002. "Beyond Oaxaca-Blinder : Accounting for Differences in Household Income Distributions Across Countries," DELTA Working Papers, DELTA (Ecole normale supérieure) 2002-04, DELTA (Ecole normale supérieure).
  2. Lixin Cai & John Creedy & Guyonne Kalb, 2004. "Accounting for Population Ageing in Tax Microsimulation Modelling by Survey Reweighting," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne wp2004n26, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
  3. Anne-Sophie Robilliard & Sherman Robinson, 2003. "Reconciling Household Surveys and National Accounts Data Using a Cross Entropy Estimation Method," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 49(3), pages 395-406, 09.
  4. François Bourguignon & Maurizio Bussolo & Luiz A. Pereira da Silva, 2008. "The Impact of Macroeconomic Policies on Poverty and Income Distribution : Macro-Micro Evaluation Techniques and Tools," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 6586, August.
  5. Kym Anderson & John Cockburn & Will Martin, 2010. "Agricultural Price Distortions, Inequality, and Poverty," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 2430, August.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Bussolo, Maurizio & De Hoyos, Rafael E. & Medvedev, Denis, 2008. "Is the developing world catching up ? global convergence and national rising dispersion," Policy Research Working Paper Series, The World Bank 4733, The World Bank.
  2. De Hoyos, Rafael E. & Medvedev, Denis, 2009. "Poverty effects of higher food prices : a global perspective," Policy Research Working Paper Series, The World Bank 4887, The World Bank.
  3. Bussolo, Maurizio & Maliszewska, Maryla & Murard, Elie, 2014. "The long-awaited rise of the middle class in Latin America is finally happening," Policy Research Working Paper Series, The World Bank 6912, The World Bank.
  4. Bas Ruijven & Marc Levy & Arun Agrawal & Frank Biermann & Joern Birkmann & Timothy Carter & Kristie Ebi & Matthias Garschagen & Bryan Jones & Roger Jones & Eric Kemp-Benedict & Marcel Kok & Kasper Kok, 2014. "Enhancing the relevance of Shared Socioeconomic Pathways for climate change impacts, adaptation and vulnerability research," Climatic Change, Springer, Springer, vol. 122(3), pages 481-494, February.
  5. Cororaton, Caesar B. & Timilsina, Govinda R., 2012. "Impacts of large-scale expansion of biofuels on global poverty and income distribution," Policy Research Working Paper Series, The World Bank 6078, The World Bank.
  6. Peter Edward & Andy Sumner, 2014. "The Poor, the Prosperous and the ?Inbetweeners?: A Fresh Perspective on Global Society, Inequality and Growth," Working Papers, International Policy Centre for Inclusive Growth 122, International Policy Centre for Inclusive Growth.
  7. van der Mensbrugghe, Dominique & Osorio Rodarte, Israel & Burns, Andrew & Baffes, John, 2009. "How to feed the world in 2050: Macroeconomic environment, commodity markets - A longer temr outlook," MPRA Paper 19019, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  8. Nwaobi, Godwin, 2014. "Inequality,Poverty and Hunger in Developing Countries: Sustainability Implications," MPRA Paper 53962, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  9. Mathilde Douillet, 2012. "Trade policies and agriculture in Sub-Saharan Africa: Comparative analysis in a Computable General Equilibrium framework," Sciences Po publications, Sciences Po info:hdl:2441/45eb019724s, Sciences Po.
  10. Wang, Xinxin & Chen, Kevin & Huang, Zuhui, 2013. "The Impact of China's Demographic Transition on Economic Growth and Income Distribution: CGE Modeling with Top-Down Micro-Simulation," 2013 Annual Meeting, August 4-6, 2013, Washington, D.C., Agricultural and Applied Economics Association 151276, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
  11. Peter Edward & Andy Sumner, 2013. "The Future of Global Poverty in a Multi-Speed World: New Estimates of Scale, Location and Cost," Working Papers, International Policy Centre for Inclusive Growth 111, International Policy Centre for Inclusive Growth.
  12. repec:spo:wpecon:info:hdl:2441/45eb019724sn6sg9melpggksl is not listed on IDEAS

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ijm:journl:v:3:y:2010:i:1:p:92-103. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Gijs Dekkers).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.