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On the Evolution of Pareto-Optimal Behavior in Repeated Coordination Problems

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  • Lagunoff, Roger

Abstract

I characterize the asymptotic behavior of a society facing a repeated-common-interest game. In this society, new individuals enter to replace their "parents" at random times. Each entrant has possibly different beliefs about others' behavior than his or her predecessor. A self-confirming equilibrium (SCE) belief process describes an evolution of beliefs in this society consistent with a self-confirming equilibrium of the repeated game. The main result shows that for any common-interest game, the Pareto-dominant equilibrium is a globally absorbing state of the behavioral dynamics when the SCE beliefs of new entrants satisfy certain independence and full-support properties. This result does not involve either of the usual assumptions of myopia or large inertia common in evolutionary models, nor is this result possible if only Nash rather than self-confirming equilibria are considered. Copyright 2000 by Economics Department of the University of Pennsylvania and the Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association in its journal International Economic Review.

Volume (Year): 41 (2000)
Issue (Month): 2 (May)
Pages: 273-93

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Handle: RePEc:ier:iecrev:v:41:y:2000:i:2:p:273-93

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Cited by:
  1. Conley, John P. & Toossi, Ali & Wooders, Myrna, 2001. "Evolution & voting : how nature makes us public spirited," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 601, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.
  2. Angelo Antoci & Massimiliano Landi, 2006. "Expectations, Animal Spirits, and Evolutionary Dynamics," Macroeconomics Working Papers 22057, East Asian Bureau of Economic Research.
  3. John P. Conley & Myrna Wooders, 2005. "Memetics & Voting: How Nature May Make us Public Spirited," Vanderbilt University Department of Economics Working Papers 0514, Vanderbilt University Department of Economics.
  4. Massimiliano Landi, 2007. "Global Analysis of an Expectations Augmented Evolutionary Dynamics," Development Economics Working Papers 22463, East Asian Bureau of Economic Research.

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