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Wage disparities and industry segregation: a look at Black-White income inequality from 1950-2000

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  • Nathan Marwell
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    Abstract

    The last sixty years has been a period of profound change for Black Americans. In the 1950s and 1960s, Supreme Court cases and federal legislation eliminated many unfair and discriminatory laws passed over the course of the prior century that had effectively subordinated Black Americans to second class citizenship. A variety of social and economic conditions have changed during the roughly six decades since the modern Civil Rights Movement began, in part as a result of these decisions, and significant shifts in cultural norms and beliefs, as well. The purpose of this article is to explore some of the economic ramifications of this change, focusing specifically on the labor market and changes in income differentials between Black and White Americans during the period.

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    File URL: http://www.chicagofed.org/digital_assets/publications/profitwise_news_and_views/2009/PNV_July2009_spEd_wage_disparaties_web.pdf
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago in its journal Profitwise.

    Volume (Year): (2009)
    Issue (Month): Jul ()
    Pages: 10-16

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    Handle: RePEc:fip:fedhpw:y:2009:i:jul:p:10-16

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    Related research

    Keywords: Income distribution ; Discrimination in employment ; Wages - Law and legislation;

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    1. Carrington, William J & Troske, Kenneth R, 1997. "On Measuring Segregation in Samples with Small Units," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 15(4), pages 402-09, October.
    2. Brown, Charles, 1984. "Black-White Earnings Ratios since the Civil Rights Act of 1964: The Importance of Labor Market Dropouts," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 99(1), pages 31-44, February.
    3. Kenneth J. Arrow, 1998. "What Has Economics to Say about Racial Discrimination?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 12(2), pages 91-100, Spring.
    4. Derek Neal, 2004. "The Measured Black-White Wage Gap among Women Is Too Small," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 112(S1), pages S1-S28, February.
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