Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

The transition to consumption taxation, Part 2: the impact on existing financial assets

Contents:

Author Info

  • Alan D. Viard

Abstract

Replacing the income tax with a consumption tax is likely to reduce the total value of the capital stock. Alan D. Viard reviews how this decline is divided between bondholders and stockholders and the effect on household borrowers and lenders. He explains that the results depend on whether monetary policy accommodates the tax through a higher price level. Without accommodation, the decline in the value of capital is largely borne by stockholders and there is little reallocation of wealth between household borrowers and lenders. If the tax is fully accommodated, bondholders bear heavier burdens than stockholders and household borrowers gain at the expense of the household lenders.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www.dallasfed.org/assets/documents/research/efr/2001/efr0102c.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas in its journal Economic and Financial Policy Review.

Volume (Year): (2001)
Issue (Month): Q II ()
Pages: 20-31

as in new window
Handle: RePEc:fip:fedder:y:2001:i:qii:p:20-31

Contact details of provider:
Email:
Web page: http://www.dallasfed.org/
More information through EDIRC

Order Information:
Email:

Related research

Keywords: Taxation ; Stocks ; Monetary policy ; Wealth;

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Taylor, John B., 1999. "Staggered price and wage setting in macroeconomics," Handbook of Macroeconomics, in: J. B. Taylor & M. Woodford (ed.), Handbook of Macroeconomics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 15, pages 1009-1050 Elsevier.
  2. Evan F. Koenig & Gregory W. Huffman, 1998. "The dynamic impact of fundamental tax reform part 1: the basic model," Economic and Financial Policy Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, issue Q 1, pages 24-37.
  3. Alan D. Viard, 2000. "The transition to consumption taxation, part 1: the impact on existing capital," Economic and Financial Policy Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, issue Q3, pages 2-22.
  4. Gregory W. Huffman & Evan F. Koenig, 1998. "The dynamic impact of fundamental tax reform part 2 : extensions," Economic and Financial Policy Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, issue Q II, pages 1.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:fip:fedder:y:2001:i:qii:p:20-31. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Delia Rodriguez).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.