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Does distance matter? Exploring the links among values, motivations, home location, and satisfaction in walking trips

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  • Manaugh, Kevin
  • El-Geneidy, Ahmed M.
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    Abstract

    This research utilizes a large-scale travel survey that captures two important – but often overlooked – elements: traveler motivations and satisfaction levels. Attitudes towards exercise, social interaction, and the environment are central motivations affecting individual’s choice of mode. Trip satisfaction is a complex element that has important ramifications for understanding travel behavior. Using clustering techniques, walkers are stratified into one of six distinct groups based on underlying values and motivations. Among other findings, people who are most concerned with environmental issues and physical activity are walking much longer distances than average and are much more satisfied with their commute. In addition, a new conceptual model of walking behavior is presented that suggests that underlying values lead to home location decisions while simultaneously having a moderating effect on the perception and satisfaction with travel. This research adds to the burgeoning debate surrounding how various aspects of travel can best be measured, conceptualized and modeled for better public policy.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice.

    Volume (Year): 50 (2013)
    Issue (Month): C ()
    Pages: 198-208

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:transa:v:50:y:2013:i:c:p:198-208

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    Related research

    Keywords: Walking; Travel behavior; Satisfaction; Active transportation; Residential self-selection;

    References

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    1. Walker, Joan & Ben-Akiva, Moshe, 2002. "Generalized random utility model," Mathematical Social Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 43(3), pages 303-343, July.
    2. Bert van Wee, 2009. "Self‐Selection: A Key to a Better Understanding of Location Choices, Travel Behaviour and Transport Externalities?," Transport Reviews, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 29(3), pages 279-292, January.
    3. Mokhtarian, Patricia L. & Cao, Xinyu, 2008. "Examining the impacts of residential self-selection on travel behavior: A focus on methodologies," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 42(3), pages 204-228, March.
    4. Abou-Zeid, Maya & Ben-Akiva, Moshe, 2011. "The effect of social comparisons on commute well-being," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 45(4), pages 345-361, May.
    5. Wendy Bohte & Kees Maat & Bert van Wee, 2009. "Measuring Attitudes in Research on Residential Self‐Selection and Travel Behaviour: A Review of Theories and Empirical Research," Transport Reviews, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 29(3), pages 325-357, February.
    6. Stradling, Stephen G. & Anable, Jillian & Carreno, Michael, 2007. "Performance, importance and user disgruntlement: A six-step method for measuring satisfaction with travel modes," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 41(1), pages 98-106, January.
    7. Ben-Akiva, Moshe & McFadden, Daniel & Train, Kenneth & Börsch-Supan, Axel, 2002. "Hybrid Choice Models: Progress and Challenges," Sonderforschungsbereich 504 Publications 02-29, Sonderforschungsbereich 504, Universität Mannheim;Sonderforschungsbereich 504, University of Mannheim.
    8. Ory, David T. & Mokhtarian, Patricia L., 2005. "When is getting there half the fun? Modeling the liking for travel," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 39(2-3), pages 97-123.
    9. Anable, Jillian & Gatersleben, Birgitta, 2005. "All work and no play? The role of instrumental and affective factors in work and leisure journeys by different travel modes," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 39(2-3), pages 163-181.
    10. Páez, Antonio & Whalen, Kate, 2010. "Enjoyment of commute: A comparison of different transportation modes," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 44(7), pages 537-549, August.
    11. Ettema, Dick & Gärling, Tommy & Olsson, Lars E. & Friman, Margareta, 2010. "Out-of-home activities, daily travel, and subjective well-being," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 44(9), pages 723-732, November.
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    Cited by:
    1. Lo, Siu Hing & van Breukelen, Gerard J.P. & Peters, Gjalt-Jorn Y. & Kok, Gerjo, 2013. "Proenvironmental travel behavior among office workers: A qualitative study of individual and organizational determinants," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 56(C), pages 11-22.

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