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Gambling on sport sponsorship: A conceptual framework for research and regulatory review

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  • Lamont, Matthew
  • Hing, Nerilee
  • Gainsbury, Sally
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    Abstract

    Commercial gambling providers (CGPs) have recently intensified the promotion of their products and services through sport sponsorship. Consequently, gambling products and services now gain substantial exposure to large audiences via media broadcasts of sport. Due to the mainstream appeal of some sports, television audiences and fan-bases can include youth, at-risk and problem gamblers, who may be prompted to gamble, or to increase their gambling, by the direct marketing, alignment of gambling with a ‘healthy’ activity and increased normalisation of gambling. Therefore, sport sponsorship by CGPs promotes a potentially risky behaviour and may exacerbate the public health issue of problem gambling. Regulatory measures have been implemented by governments and private organisations in relation to sport sponsorship by tobacco companies in recognition of the potential harmful impacts of this form of marketing. Subsequently, the involvement of ‘unhealthy products’ including alcohol, junk food and gambling in sport sponsorship has been publicly questioned. This may lead to further regulatory changes that would directly affect the management of sport organisations. Few studies have examined these issues and there is little knowledge of the impacts that sport sponsorship arrangements have on society. Research is needed to inform prudent decision-making about the appropriate regulation of sport sponsorship. This paper reviews the current gambling sport sponsorship landscape and proposes a conceptual framework aimed at facilitating a systematic, interdisciplinary research agenda for examining corporate social responsibility issues pertinent to the sponsorship of sport by CGPs.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Sport Management Review.

    Volume (Year): 14 (2011)
    Issue (Month): 3 (August)
    Pages: 246-257

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:spomar:v:14:y:2011:i:3:p:246-257

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    Keywords: Corporate social responsibility Sport Sponsorship Gambling Regulation;

    References

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    1. McKelvey, Stephen M., 2004. "The Growth in Marketing Alliances between US Professional Sport and Legalised Gambling Entities: Are We Putting Sport Consumers at Risk?," Sport Management Review, Elsevier, vol. 7(2), pages 193-210, November.
    2. Carroll, Archie B., 1991. "The pyramid of corporate social responsibility: Toward the moral management of organizational stakeholders," Business Horizons, Elsevier, vol. 34(4), pages 39-48.
    3. MaryAnn Reynolds & Kristi Yuthas, 2008. "Moral Discourse and Corporate Social Responsibility Reporting," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 78(1), pages 47-64, March.
    4. McDaniel, Stephen R. & Heald, Gary R., 2000. "Young Consumers' Responses to Event Sponsorship Advertisements of Unhealthy Products: Implications of Schema-triggered Affect Theory," Sport Management Review, Elsevier, vol. 3(2), pages 163-184, November.
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    Cited by:
    1. Cunningham, George B., 2013. "Theory and theory development in sport management," Sport Management Review, Elsevier, vol. 16(1), pages 1-4.

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