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The impact of pensions on health and wellbeing in rural South Africa: Does gender matter?

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  • Schatz, Enid
  • Gómez-Olivé, Xavier
  • Ralston, Margaret
  • Menken, Jane
  • Tollman, Stephen
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    Abstract

    Unique to Africa, a means-tested non-contributory pension is available to South Africans. In 2006, women over 60 and men over 65 were pension-eligible. To explore the effect of the pension for health and wellbeing indicators of rural South African men and women, we analyze data from the WHO-INDEPTH Study of Global Ageing and Adult Health Survey, carried out in the Agincourt sub-district by the MRC/Wits Rural Public Health and Health Transitions Research Unit (Agincourt) in 2006. Because pension receipt was not measured directly, our findings represent intent-to-treat (ITT) rather than treatment-on-the-treated (TOT) effects using age as an indicator for intent-to-treat. Overall, women report poorer wellbeing compared to men. However, women have a “honeymoon” period at ages 60–64, the first years of pension-eligibility, in which they report lower levels of worry and sadness, and higher overall happiness, life satisfaction, and quality of life as compared to younger and older women. For men, in contrast, reports of wellbeing worsen in the pre-pension years, followed by a similar but not as prominent pattern of favorable reports in the five years following pension-eligibility, and a decline in the next five-year period. Thus, while pensions continue to enhance financial wellbeing, our results suggest that their effect on social wellbeing may be gendered and transitory. Further research is needed to improve understanding of these dynamics.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Social Science & Medicine.

    Volume (Year): 75 (2012)
    Issue (Month): 10 ()
    Pages: 1864-1873

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:75:y:2012:i:10:p:1864-1873

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    Related research

    Keywords: South Africa; Gender; Pension; Social wellbeing; Quality of life; Health and demographic surveillance system; Aging;

    References

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    1. Anna Lau & Robert Cummins & Wenda Mcpherson, 2005. "An Investigation into the Cross-Cultural Equivalence of the Personal Wellbeing Index," Social Indicators Research, Springer, vol. 72(3), pages 403-430, 07.
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    10. Cally Ardington & Anne Case & Mahnaz Islam & David Lam & Murray Leibbrandt & Alicia Menendez & Analia Olgiati, 2009. "The impact of AIDS on intergenerational support in South Africa: Evidence from the Cape Area Panel Study," SALDRU Working Papers 27, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.
    11. Maitra, Pushkar & Ray, Ranjan, 2003. "The effect of transfers on household expenditure patterns and poverty in South Africa," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 71(1), pages 23-49, June.
    12. Schatz, Enid & Ogunmefun, Catherine, 2007. "Caring and Contributing: The Role of Older Women in Rural South African Multi-generational Households in the HIV/AIDS Era," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 35(8), pages 1390-1403, August.
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