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Patients' attitudes vs. physicians' determination: implications for cesarean sections

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  • Lo, Joan C.
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    Abstract

    Most research studies identifying non-clinical factors that influence the choice of Cesarean Section as a method of obstetric delivery assume that the physician makes the decision. This paper arguably shows the role played by the mother. Owing to the fact that Chinese people generally believe that choosing the right days for certain life events, such as marriage, can change a person's fate into a better one, the hypothesis is tested that the probability of Cesarean Sections being performed is significantly higher on auspicious days and significantly lower on inauspicious days. By employing a logistic model and utilizing 1998 birth certificate data for Taiwan, we are able to show that the hypothesis is accepted.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Social Science & Medicine.

    Volume (Year): 57 (2003)
    Issue (Month): 1 (July)
    Pages: 91-96

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:57:y:2003:i:1:p:91-96

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    Keywords: Cesarean sections Culture Patients' attitude Maternal requests Taiwan;

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    Cited by:
    1. Daniele Fabbri & Chiara Monfardini, 2006. "Style of practice and assortative mating: a recursive probit analysis of cesarean section scheduling in Italy," CHILD Working Papers wp06_06, CHILD - Centre for Household, Income, Labour and Demographic economics - ITALY.
    2. Gans, Joshua S. & Leigh, Andrew, 2009. "Born on the first of July: An (un)natural experiment in birth timing," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 93(1-2), pages 246-263, February.
    3. Schulkind, Lisa & Shapiro, Teny Maghakian, 2014. "What a difference a day makes: Quantifying the effects of birth timing manipulation on infant health," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(C), pages 139-158.
    4. Levy, Becca R. & Chung, Pil H. & Slade, Martin D., 2011. "Influence of Valentine’s Day and Halloween on Birth Timing," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 73(8), pages 1246-1248.

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