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Wrong person and wrong place: for homelessness, the conjunction is what matters

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  • O'Flaherty, Brendan
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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Housing Economics.

    Volume (Year): 13 (2004)
    Issue (Month): 1 (March)
    Pages: 1-15

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:jhouse:v:13:y:2004:i:1:p:1-15

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    Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/622881

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    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
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    1. Early, Dirk W., 1999. "A Microeconomic Analysis of Homelessness: An Empirical Investigation Using Choice-Based Sampling," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 8(4), pages 312-327, December.
    2. Quigley, John M. & Raphael, Steven & Smolensky, Eugene, 2002. "Homeless in America, Homeless in California," Berkeley Program on Housing and Urban Policy, Working Paper Series qt4v61c0ws, Berkeley Program on Housing and Urban Policy.
    3. Christina Paxson & Jane Waldfogel, 1999. "Work, Welfare, and Child Maltreatment," Working Papers 278, Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Center for Health and Wellbeing..
    4. Edgar O. Olsen & Dirk W. Early, 2001. "Subsidized Housing, Emergency Shelters, and Homelessness: An Empirical Investigation Using Data from the 1990 Census," Virginia Economics Online Papers 352, University of Virginia, Department of Economics.
    5. Troutman, William Harris & Jackson, John D & Ekelund, Robert B, Jr, 1999. " Public Policy, Perverse Incentives, and the Homeless Problem," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 98(1-2), pages 195-212, January.
    6. Dirk W. Early, 1998. "The role of subsidized housing in reducing homelessness: An empirical investigation using micro-data," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 17(4), pages 687-696.
    7. Jane Waldfogel & Christina Paxson, 1999. "Parental Resources and Child Abuse and Neglect," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(2), pages 239-244, May.
    8. Early, Dirk W. & Olsen, Edgar O., 1998. "Rent control and homelessness," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(6), pages 797-816, November.
    9. Honig, Marjorie & Filer, Randall K, 1993. "Causes of Intercity Variation in Homelessness," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 83(1), pages 248-55, March.
    10. John M. Quigley, 1990. "Does rent control cause homelessness? taking the claim seriously," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 9(1), pages 89-93.
    11. Grimes, Paul W. & Chressanthis, George A., 1997. "Assessing the Effect of Rent Control on Homelessness," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(1), pages 23-37, January.
    12. Cragg, Michael & O'Flaherty, Brendan, 1999. "Do Homeless Shelter Conditions Determine Shelter Population? The Case of the Dinkins Deluge," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 46(3), pages 377-415, November.
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    Cited by:
    1. O'Flaherty, Brendan & Wu, Ting, 2006. "Fewer subsidized exits and a recession: How New York City's family homeless shelter population became immense," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(2), pages 99-125, June.
    2. O’Flaherty, Brendan, 2012. "Individual homelessness: Entries, exits, and policy," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(2), pages 77-100.
    3. Early, Dirk W., 2005. "An empirical investigation of the determinants of street homelessness," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(1), pages 27-47, March.

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