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Peer effects in adolescent overweight

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Author Info

  • Trogdon, Justin G.
  • Nonnemaker, James
  • Pais, Joanne

Abstract

This study is the first to estimate peer effects for adolescent weight. We use data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health) and define peer groups using nominated friends within schools. Endogenous peer groups are accounted for using a combination of school fixed effects, instrumental variables, and alternative definitions of peers (i.e., grade-level peers). Mean peer weight is correlated with adolescent weight, even after controlling endogenous peer groups. The impact of peer weight is larger among females and adolescents with high body mass index. The results are consistent with social multipliers for adolescent overweight policies.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Health Economics.

Volume (Year): 27 (2008)
Issue (Month): 5 (September)
Pages: 1388-1399

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Handle: RePEc:eee:jhecon:v:27:y:2008:i:5:p:1388-1399

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/505560

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  7. Jeffrey R. Kling & Jens Ludwig & Lawrence F. Katz, 2005. "Neighborhood Effects on Crime for Female and Male Youth: Evidence from a Randomized Housing Voucher Experiment," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 120(1), pages 87-130, January.
  8. Peter Kooreman & Adriaan R. Soetevent, 2007. "A discrete-choice model with social interactions: with an application to high school teen behavior," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 22(3), pages 599-624.
  9. Manski, Charles F, 1993. "Identification of Endogenous Social Effects: The Reflection Problem," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 60(3), pages 531-42, July.
  10. Evans, William N & Oates, Wallace E & Schwab, Robert M, 1992. "Measuring Peer Group Effects: A Study of Teenage Behavior," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 100(5), pages 966-91, October.
  11. Shapiro, Jesse & Glaeser, Edward & Cutler, David, 2003. "Why Have Americans Become More Obese," Scholarly Articles 2640583, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  12. Lundborg, Petter, 2006. "Having the wrong friends? Peer effects in adolescent substance use," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 25(2), pages 214-233, March.
  13. Amemiya, Takeshi, 1982. "Two Stage Least Absolute Deviations Estimators," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 50(3), pages 689-711, May.
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