Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

How 'Islamic' is Islamic Banking?

Contents:

Author Info

  • Khan, Feisal
Registered author(s):

    Abstract

    Islamic Banks hold well over US $700 billion in assets and are growing at over 15% p.a. Islamic Banking and Finance (IBF) involves wider ethical and moral issues than simply 'interest-free' transactions. Its advocates argue that these make it more economically efficient than conventional banking and promote greater economic equity and justice. To what extent, then, do actual Islamic Banking practices live up to the ideal, and how different are they from conventional banking? A preliminary investigation shows that, three decades after its introduction, there remain substantial divergences between IBF's ideals and its practices, and much of IBF still remains functionally indistinguishable from conventional banking. This runs counter to claims by IBF advocates that it would rapidly differentiate itself from conventional banking. However, despite not providing an alternative to conventional banking and finance, IBF does strengthen a distinctly Islamic identity by providing the appropriate Islamic terminology for de facto conventional financial transactions.

    Download Info

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6V8F-514919P-2/2/ea98ed32c89fb3f807436f4c21c39b80
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization.

    Volume (Year): 76 (2010)
    Issue (Month): 3 (December)
    Pages: 805-820

    as in new window
    Handle: RePEc:eee:jeborg:v:76:y:2010:i:3:p:805-820

    Contact details of provider:
    Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jebo

    Related research

    Keywords: Islamic Banking Murabaha Riba Interest-free finance;

    References

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
    as in new window
    1. Presley, John R & Sessions, John G, 1994. "Islamic Economics: The Emergence of a New Paradigm," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 104(424), pages 584-96, May.
    2. Williamson, Stephen D, 1987. "Costly Monitoring, Loan Contracts, and Equilibrium Credit Rationing," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 102(1), pages 135-45, February.
    3. Robert Townsend, 1979. "Optimal contracts and competitive markets with costly state verification," Staff Report 45, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
    4. Pal, Izzud-Din, 2006. "Islam and the Economy of Pakistan: A Critical Analysis of Traditional Interpretation," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780195470017, October.
    5. Stiglitz, Joseph E & Weiss, Andrew, 1981. "Credit Rationing in Markets with Imperfect Information," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 71(3), pages 393-410, June.
    6. Kuran, Timur, 2005. "The logic of financial westernization in the Middle East," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 56(4), pages 593-615, April.
    7. Glaeser, Edward L & Scheinkman, Jose, 1998. "Neither a Borrower nor a Lender Be: An Economic Analysis of Interest Restrictions and Usury Laws," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 41(1), pages 1-36, April.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as in new window

    Cited by:
    1. Raphie Hayat & Frank A.G. den Butter & Udo Kock, 2011. "Halal Certification for Financial Products: A Transaction Cost Perspective," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 11-171/3, Tinbergen Institute.
    2. A. F. Aysan & M. Disli & H. Ozturk & I. M. Turhan, 2013. "Are Islamic Banks Subject to Depositor Discipline?," Working Papers of Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, Ghent University, Belgium 13/871, Ghent University, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration.
    3. M. Shahid Ebrahim & Seema Makhdoomi & Mustapha Sheikh, 2012. "The Political Economy and the Perennial Underdevelopment of the Muslim World," Working Papers 12011, Bangor Business School, Prifysgol Bangor University (Cymru / Wales).
    4. Beck, Thorsten & Demirgüç-Kunt, Asli & Merrouche, Ouarda, 2013. "Islamic vs. conventional banking: Business model, efficiency and stability," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(2), pages 433-447.
    5. Baele, L. & Farooq, M. & Ongena, S., 2012. "Of Religion and Redemption: Evidence from Default on Islamic Loans (Replaces CentER DP 2010-136)," Discussion Paper 2012-014, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
    6. Murizah Osman Salleh & Aziz Jaafar & M. Shahid Ebrahim, 2011. "The Inhibition of Usury (Riba An-Nasi'ah) and the Economic Underdevelopment of the Muslim World," Working Papers 11002, Bangor Business School, Prifysgol Bangor University (Cymru / Wales).
    7. Nathan Berg & Jeong-Yoo Kim, 2013. "Prohibition of Riba and Gharar: A signaling and screening explanation?," Working Papers 1314, University of Otago, Department of Economics, revised Nov 2013.
    8. Raphie Hayat & Frank A.G. den Butter & Udo Kock, 2011. "Halal Certification for Financial Products: A Transaction Cost Perspective," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 11-171/3, Tinbergen Institute.
    9. Karim ben Khediri & Lanouar Charfeddine & Slah ben Youssef, 2014. "Islamic vs. conventional banks in the GCC countries: A comparative study using classification techniques," Working Papers 2014-505, Department of Research, Ipag Business School.

    Lists

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:jeborg:v:76:y:2010:i:3:p:805-820. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Zhang, Lei).

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.