Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

The rejection of brand hegemony

Contents:

Author Info

  • Cromie, John G.
  • Ewing, Mike T.
Registered author(s):

    Abstract

    Purveyors of strong brands can, through a number of the means intended to bolster their brand image, alienate and frustrate their consumers to the point of creating a broad-based reaction -- the rejection of brand hegemony. The literature describes a number of motivations for anti-consumption behavior. This paper explores the rejection of brand hegemony as a motivation for, and an expression of, anti-consumption, through a phenomenological study of the open source software (OSS) community. The study explores whether, and to what extent, the OSS community actively rejects software's dominant brand, Microsoft, and what motivations may be at work in the creation and expression of that rejection. Findings elucidate the necessary conditions for the rejection of brand hegemony to occur, revealing valuable lessons for vendors. These conditions comprise environment, positive motivation and negative motivation factors. The first two conditions are relatively constant, regardless of vendor's actions, while the last is largely of the vendor's creation. The managerial and theory-building implications of the study indicate that purveyors of strong brands may inadvertently create their own anti-consumption nemesis.

    Download Info

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6V7S-4S0HC0J-1/2/f889ac859339e8582922a17e6d583e82
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Business Research.

    Volume (Year): 62 (2009)
    Issue (Month): 2 (February)
    Pages: 218-230

    as in new window
    Handle: RePEc:eee:jbrese:v:62:y:2009:i:2:p:218-230

    Contact details of provider:
    Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jbusres

    Related research

    Keywords: Anti-consumption Brand hegemony Open source Brand dominance;

    References

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
    as in new window
    1. Kozinets, Robert V, 2002. " Can Consumers Escape the Market? Emancipatory Illuminations from Burning Man," Journal of Consumer Research, University of Chicago Press, vol. 29(1), pages 20-38, June.
    2. Holt, Douglas B, 1995. " How Consumers Consume: A Typology of Consumption Practices," Journal of Consumer Research, University of Chicago Press, vol. 22(1), pages 1-16, June.
    3. Muniz, Albert M, Jr & O'Guinn, Thomas C, 2001. " Brand Community," Journal of Consumer Research, University of Chicago Press, vol. 27(4), pages 412-32, March.
    4. Hertel, Guido & Niedner, Sven & Herrmann, Stefanie, 2003. "Motivation of software developers in Open Source projects: an Internet-based survey of contributors to the Linux kernel," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 32(7), pages 1159-1177, July.
    5. Schouten, John W & McAlexander, James H, 1995. " Subcultures of Consumptions: An Ethnography of the New Bikers," Journal of Consumer Research, University of Chicago Press, vol. 22(1), pages 43-61, June.
    6. Spiggle, Susan, 1994. " Analysis and Interpretation of Qualitative Data in Consumer Research," Journal of Consumer Research, University of Chicago Press, vol. 21(3), pages 491-503, December.
    7. Zeitlyn, David, 2003. "Gift economies in the development of open source software: anthropological reflections," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 32(7), pages 1287-1291, July.
    8. Holt, Douglas B, 2002. " Why Do Brands Cause Trouble? A Dialectical Theory of Consumer Culture and Branding," Journal of Consumer Research, University of Chicago Press, vol. 29(1), pages 70-90, June.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as in new window

    Cited by:
    1. Braunsberger, Karin & Buckler, Brian, 2011. "What motivates consumers to participate in boycotts: Lessons from the ongoing Canadian seafood boycott," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 64(1), pages 96-102, January.
    2. Ewing, Michael T. & Wagstaff, Peter E. & Powell, Irene H., 2013. "Brand rivalry and community conflict," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 66(1), pages 4-12.
    3. Murat Hakan Altintas & Bahar F. Kurtulmusoglu & Hans Ruediger Kaufmann & Serkan Kilic, 2013. "Consumer boycotts of foreign products: a metric model," The AMFITEATRU ECONOMIC journal, Academy of Economic Studies - Bucharest, Romania, vol. 15(34), pages 485-504, June.

    Lists

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:jbrese:v:62:y:2009:i:2:p:218-230. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Zhang, Lei).

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.