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Firm competitiveness and the European Union emissions trading scheme

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  • Chan, Hei Sing (Ron)
  • Li, Shanjun
  • Zhang, Fan

Abstract

The European Union Emissions Trading Scheme is the first international cap-and-trade program for CO2 and the largest carbon pricing regime in the world. A principle concern over the Emissions Trading Scheme is the potential impact on the competitiveness of industry. Using a panel of 5873 firms in 10 European countries during 2001–2009, this paper seeks to assess the impact of the carbon regulation on three variables through which the effects on firm competitiveness may manifest—unit material costs, employment and revenue. Our analysis focuses on three most polluting industries covered under the program-power, cement, and iron and steel. Empirical results indicate that the emissions trading program had different impacts across these three sectors. While no impacts are found on any of the three variables in cement and iron and steel industries, our analysis suggests a positive effect on both material costs and revenue in the power sector: the effect on material costs likely reflects the costs to comply with emissions constraints or other parallel renewable incentive programs while that on revenue may partly due to cost pass-through to consumers in a market less exposed to competition outside EU. Overall our findings do not substantiate concerns over carbon leakage, job loss and industry competitiveness at least during the study period.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Energy Policy.

Volume (Year): 63 (2013)
Issue (Month): C ()
Pages: 1056-1064

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Handle: RePEc:eee:enepol:v:63:y:2013:i:c:p:1056-1064

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/enpol

Related research

Keywords: Cap and trade; EU emissions trading scheme; Firm competitiveness;

References

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  1. Jurate Jaraite & Corrado Di Maria, 2011. "Efficiency, Productivity and Environmental Policy: A Case Study of Power Generation in the EU," Working Papers 2011.19, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
  2. Adam B. Jaffe et al., 1995. "Environmental Regulation and the Competitiveness of U.S. Manufacturing: What Does the Evidence Tell Us?," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 33(1), pages 132-163, March.
  3. Considine , Timothy J. & Larson, Donald F., 2009. "Substitution and technological change under carbon cap and trade : lessons from Europe," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4957, The World Bank.
  4. Schmalensee, Richard & Stavins, Robert N., 2012. "The SO2 Allowance Trading System: The Ironic History of a Grand Policy Experiment," Working Paper Series rwp12-030, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.
  5. Anger, Niels & Oberndorfer, Ulrich, 2008. "Firm performance and employment in the EU emissions trading scheme: An empirical assessment for Germany," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(1), pages 12-22, January.
  6. Demailly, Damien & Quirion, Philippe, 2008. "European Emission Trading Scheme and competitiveness: A case study on the iron and steel industry," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(4), pages 2009-2027, July.
  7. Carlson, Curtis & Burtraw, Dallas & Cropper, Maureen & Palmer, Karen L., 1998. "Sulfur dioxide control by electric utilities : what are the gains from trade?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1966, The World Bank.
  8. Corrado Di Maria & Barry Anderson & Frank Convery, 2009. "Abatement and Allocation in the Pilot Phase of the EU ETS," Working Papers 2009.110, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
  9. A. Ellerman & Barbara Buchner, 2008. "Over-Allocation or Abatement? A Preliminary Analysis of the EU ETS Based on the 2005–06 Emissions Data," Environmental & Resource Economics, European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 41(2), pages 267-287, October.
  10. De Perthuis, Christian & Convery, Frank J. & Ellerman, Denny, 2010. "Pricing carbon : the European Union Emissions Trading Scheme," Economics Papers from University Paris Dauphine 123456789/10174, Paris Dauphine University.
  11. Jan Abrell & Anta Ndoye Faye & Georg Zachmann, 2011. "Assessing the impact of the EU ETS using firm level data," Working Papers of BETA 2011-15, Bureau d'Economie Théorique et Appliquée, UDS, Strasbourg.
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Cited by:
  1. Sebastian Petrick & Ulrich J. Wagner, 2014. "The Impact of Carbon Trading on Industry: Evidence from German Manufacturing Firms," Kiel Working Papers 1912, Kiel Institute for the World Economy.

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