Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

Supply and demand elasticities in the U.S. ethanol fuel market

Contents:

Author Info

  • Luchansky, Matthew S.
  • Monks, James

Abstract

The market for ethanol has grown from approximately 1.2billion gallons in 1997 to almost 5billion gallons in 2006. With the huge increase in ethanol demand in recent years, the growth in derived demand for corn has driven up many food prices. This paper uses monthly data from 1997-2006 to estimate the market supply and demand for ethanol at the national level. The simultaneous determination of the supply and demand curves using two-stage least squares allows for the calculation of supply and demand-side elasticities, which are important results in light of the tremendous growth in this market and recent legislation concerning ethanol.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6V7G-4V75YT0-1/2/56ce86847222aa32b2b3abed4424bf13
Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Energy Economics.

Volume (Year): 31 (2009)
Issue (Month): 3 (May)
Pages: 403-410

as in new window
Handle: RePEc:eee:eneeco:v:31:y:2009:i:3:p:403-410

Contact details of provider:
Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/eneco

Related research

Keywords: Ethanol Renewable resources;

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Gallagher, Paul W. & Shapouri, Hosein & Price, Jeffrey & Schamel, Guenter & Brubaker, Heather, 2003. "Some long-run effects of growing markets and renewable fuel standards on additives markets and the US ethanol industry," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 25(6-7), pages 585-608, September.
  2. anonymous, 2007. "Bank dedicates cornerstone," TEN, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, issue Win, pages 26-27.
  3. Rask, Kevin N., 1998. "Clean air and renewable fuels: the market for fuel ethanol in the US from 1984 to 1993," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 20(3), pages 325-345, June.
  4. Gallagher, Paul W. & Shapouri, Hosein & Price, Jeffrey & Schamel, Guenter & Brubaker, Heather, 2003. "Some Long-Run Effects of Growing Markets and Renewable Fuel Standards on Additives Markets and the U.S. Ethanol Industry," Staff General Research Papers 10648, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  5. Baker, Allen & Zahniser, Steven, 2007. "Ethanol Reshapes the Corn Market," Amber Waves, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, May.
  6. Hyunok Lee & Joseph W. Glauber & Daniel A. Sumner, 1994. "Increased Industrial Uses Of Agricultural Commodities Policy, Trade And Ethanol," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 12(3), pages 22-32, 07.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. de Freitas, Luciano Charlita & Kaneko, Shinji, 2011. "Ethanol demand in Brazil: Regional approach," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(5), pages 2289-2298, May.
  2. Ladislav Kristoufek & Karel Janda & David Zilberman, 2013. "Non-linear Price Transmission between Biofuels, Fuels and Food Commodities," CERGE-EI Working Papers wp481, The Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education - Economic Institute, Prague.
  3. Gardebroek, Cornelis & Hernandez, Manuel A., 2012. "Do energy prices stimulate food price volatility? Examining volatility transmission between US oil, ethanol and corn markets," 123rd Seminar, February 23-24, 2012, Dublin, Ireland 122476, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
  4. Lemoine, Derek, 2013. "Escape from Third-Best: Rating Emissions for Intensity Standards," 2014 Allied Social Science Association (ASSA) Annual Meeting, January 3-5, 2014, Philadelphia, PA 161656, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
  5. Perdiguero, Jordi & Jiménez, Juan Luis, 2011. "Sell or not sell biodiesel: Local competition and government measures," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 15(3), pages 1525-1532, April.
  6. Ladislav Kristoufek & Karel Janda & David Zilberman, 2012. "Mutual Responsiveness of Biofuels, Fuels and Food Prices," CAMA Working Papers 2012-38, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
  7. Collantes, Gustavo, 2010. "Do green tech policies need to pass the consumer test?: The case of ethanol fuel," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(6), pages 1235-1244, November.
  8. Walls, W.D. & Rusco, Frank & Kendix, Michael, 2011. "Biofuels policy and the US market for motor fuels: Empirical analysis of ethanol splashing," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(7), pages 3999-4006, July.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:eneeco:v:31:y:2009:i:3:p:403-410. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Zhang, Lei).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.