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Economic socialization, saving and assets in European young adults

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  • Webley, Paul
  • Nyhus, Ellen K.

Abstract

We analyze the role economic socialization plays in the economic behavior and asset accumulation of young adults by parents using data from European young adults and teenagers. We study the role of four distinct strands of economic socialization (providing pocket money, jobs at home, work for others, and parental encouragement) using a Dutch sample of young adults (age 18–32, n=392). Results show positive links between parental encouragement and ability to control spending, saving preferences, future orientation, conscientiousness, and saving. A sample of teenagers (age 14–15, n=548) and their parents (256 mothers, 227 fathers) is drawn for a Norwegian study of economic socialization. Analyses reveal a small difference in the socialization of adolescents from poorer and less educated backgrounds: they are less likely to receive pocket money and to have part-time work but are more likely to have piggy banks and savings accounts at a younger age. Variations in the economic socialization by parents highlight the importance of financial education in schools.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Economics of Education Review.

Volume (Year): 33 (2013)
Issue (Month): C ()
Pages: 19-30

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Handle: RePEc:eee:ecoedu:v:33:y:2013:i:c:p:19-30

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/econedurev

Related research

Keywords: Economic socialization; Young adults; Saving; Assets;

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References

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  1. B. Douglas Bernheim & Daniel M. Garrett & Dean M. Maki, 1997. "Education and Saving: The Long-Term Effects of High School Financial Curriculum Mandates," Working Papers 97012, Stanford University, Department of Economics.
  2. Annamaria Lusardi & Olivia S. Mitchell, 2011. "Financial Literacy around the World: An Overview," NBER Working Papers 17107, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Annamaria Lusardi, 2008. "Financial Literacy: An Essential Tool for Informed Consumer Choice?," NBER Working Papers 14084, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Ferber, Robert, et al, 1969. "Validation of a National Survey of Consumer Financial Characteristics: Savings Accounts," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 51(4), pages 436-44, November.
  5. Andersen, Torben M. & Holmström, Bengt & Honkapohja, Seppo & Korkman, Sixten & Söderström Hans Tson, & Vartiainen, Juhana, . "The Nordic Model. Embracing globalization and sharing risks," ETLA B, The Research Institute of the Finnish Economy, number 232, Spring.
  6. Abramovitch, Rona & Freedman, Jonathan L. & Pliner, Patricia, 1991. "Children and money: getting an allowance, credit versus cash, and knowledge of pricing," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 12(1), pages 27-45, March.
  7. Rabinovich, Anna & Webley, Paul, 2007. "Filling the gap between planning and doing: Psychological factors involved in the successful implementation of saving intention," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 28(4), pages 444-461, August.
  8. Annamaria Lusardi, 2008. "Household Saving Behavior: The Role of Financial Literacy, Information, and Financial Education Programs," NBER Working Papers 13824, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  9. Adele Atkinson & Stephen McKay & Sharon Collard & Elaine Kempson, 2007. "Levels of Financial Capability in the UK," Public Money & Management, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 27(1), pages 29-36, February.
  10. Booij, A.S. & Leuven, E. & Oosterbeek, H., 2010. "The role of information in the take-up of student loans," Working Papers 32, Top Institute for Evidence Based Education Research.
  11. Adele Atkinson & Stephen McKay & Sharon Collard & Elaine Kempson, 2007. "Levels of Financial Capability in the UK," Public Money & Management, Chartered Institute of Public Finance and Accountancy, vol. 27(1), pages 29-36, 02.
  12. Webley, Paul & Nyhus, Ellen K., 2006. "Parents' influence on children's future orientation and saving," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 27(1), pages 140-164, February.
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Cited by:
  1. Elliott, William & Sherraden, Michael, 2013. "Assets and educational achievement: Theory and evidence," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 33(C), pages 1-7.
  2. Alessandro Bucciol & Marcella Veronesi, 2013. "Teaching Children to Save and Lifetime Savings: What Is the Best Strategy?," Working Papers 10/2013, University of Verona, Department of Economics.

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