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Monetary Populism in Nineteenth-Century America: An Open Economy Interpretation

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  • Frieden, Jeffry A.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Cambridge University Press in its journal The Journal of Economic History.

Volume (Year): 57 (1997)
Issue (Month): 02 (June)
Pages: 367-395

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Handle: RePEc:cup:jechis:v:57:y:1997:i:02:p:367-395_01

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Cited by:
  1. S. Brock Blomberg & Jeffry Frieden & Ernesto Stein, 2005. "Sustaining fixed rates: The political economy of currency pegs in Latin America," Journal of Applied Economics, Universidad del CEMA, vol. 0, pages 203-225, November.
  2. Maurice Obstfeld & Alan M. Taylor, 2003. "Globalization and Capital Markets," NBER Chapters, in: Globalization in Historical Perspective, pages 121-188 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Richard C.K. Burdekin & Kris James Mitchener & Marc D. Weidenmier, 2011. "Irving Fisher and Price-Level Targeting in Austria: Was Silver the Answer?," NBER Working Papers 17123, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. J. Ernesto L=F3pez-C=F3rdova & = =20 Chris Meissner, 2001. "Exchange-Rate Regimes and International Trade: Evidence from the=20 Classical Gold Standard Era," Labor and Demography 0012003, EconWPA.
  5. Hugh Rockoff, 2000. "How Long Did It Take the United States to Become an Optimal Currency Area?," NBER Historical Working Papers 0124, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Nicholas Weller, 2009. "Trading policy: Constituents and party in U.S. trade policy," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 141(1), pages 87-101, October.
  7. Meissner, Christopher M., 2005. "A new world order: explaining the international diffusion of the gold standard, 1870-1913," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 66(2), pages 385-406, July.
  8. Scott Fulford & Felipe Schwartzman, 2013. "The credibility of exchange rate pegs and bank distress in historical perspective: lessons from the national banking era," Working Paper 13-18, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond.
  9. Hamilton-Hart, Natasha, 2011. "Distribution, Domestic Politics and Monetary Cooperation in East Asia," ADBI Working Papers 332, Asian Development Bank Institute.

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