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Endogenous Work Hours and Practice Patterns of Canadian Physicians

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  • Christopher Ferrall
  • Allan W. Gregory
  • William Tholl

Abstract

Using an extensive survey of Canadian physicians, the authors study how physician practice patterns are shaped by demographic characteristics, physician specialty, and government policy. They model the simultaneous determination of group size, primary source of professional income (fee-for-service or salaried position), weekly hours of direct patient care, and total weekly hours of work. Employing a method of maximum simulated likelihood, the coefficients are precisely identified. With all else constant in the model, physicians who work under fee-for-service see patients 5.9 more hours each week than physicians who are primarily salaried, yet fee-for-service physicians work 5.5 hours less per week in total.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Canadian Economics Association in its journal Canadian Journal of Economics.

Volume (Year): 31 (1998)
Issue (Month): 1 (February)
Pages: 1-27

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Handle: RePEc:cje:issued:v:31:y:1998:i:1:p:1-27

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Postal: Canadian Economics Association Prof. Steven Ambler, Secretary-Treasurer c/o Olivier Lebert, CEA/CJE/CPP Office C.P. 35006, 1221 Fleury Est Montréal, Québec, Canada H2C 3K4
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Cited by:
  1. Thomas F. Crossley & Jeremiah Hurley & Sung-Hee Jeon, 2007. "Physician Labour Supply in Canada: a Cohort Analysis," Centre for Health Economics and Policy Analysis Working Paper Series 2006-04, Centre for Health Economics and Policy Analysis (CHEPA), McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada.
  2. Damien Échevin & Bernard Fortin, 2011. "Physician Payment Mechanisms, Hospital Length of Stay and Risk of Readmission: a Natural Experiment," CIRANO Working Papers 2011s-44, CIRANO.
  3. Michael Benarroch & Hugh Grant, 2004. "The interprovincial migration of Canadian physicians: does income matter?," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(20), pages 2335-2345.
  4. Badi H. Baltagi & Espen Bratberg & Tor Helge Holmås, 2003. "A Panel Data Study of Physicians’ Labor Supply: The Case of Norway," CESifo Working Paper Series 895, CESifo Group Munich.
  5. Di Matteo, Livio, 2014. "Physician numbers as a driver of provincial government health spending in Canadian health policy," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 115(1), pages 18-35.
  6. Chunzhou Mu & Shiko Maruyama, 2013. "Salient Gender Difference in the Wage Elasticity of General Practitioners' Labour Supply," Discussion Papers 2013-16, School of Economics, The University of New South Wales.
  7. McDonald, James Ted & Worswick, Christopher, 2012. "The migration decisions of physicians in Canada: The roles of immigrant status and spousal characteristics," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 75(9), pages 1581-1588.
  8. Échevin, Damien & Fortin, Bernard, 2013. "Physician Payment Mechanisms, Hospital Length of Stay and Risk of Readmission: Evidence from a Natural Experiment," IZA Discussion Papers 7835, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  9. Sung-Hee Jeon & Jeremiah Hurley, 2010. "Physician Resource Planning in Canada: The Need for a Stronger Behavioural Foundation," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 36(3), pages 359-375, September.
  10. Alexandra Constant & Pierre Thomas Léger, 2008. "Estimating differences between male and female physician service provision using panel data," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 17(11), pages 1295-1315.
  11. Bernard Fortin & Nicolas Jacquemet & Bruce Shearer, 2008. "Policy Analysis in the health-services market: accounting for quality and quantity," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) halshs-00305309, HAL.
  12. Iversen, Tor, 2004. "The effects of a patient shortage on general practitioners' future income and list of patients," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(4), pages 673-694, July.
  13. repec:hal:journl:halshs-00305309 is not listed on IDEAS
  14. Sarma, Sisira & Devlin, Rose Anne & Belhadji, Bachir & Thind, Amardeep, 2010. "Does the way physicians are paid influence the way they practice? The case of Canadian family physicians' work activity," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 98(2-3), pages 203-217, December.

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