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Economic Roots of Political Conflict: The Case of Sri Lanka

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  • Sirimal Abeyratne
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    Abstract

    The escalation of political conflicts in many developing countries and their impact on economic development have been topical issues in recent development literature. The overwhelming emphasis on 'ethnic conflicts' in the literature has, however, precluded analysts from looking at political conflicts beyond their ethnic dimension, in the wider context of the development process. In particular, because of the preoccupation with ethnic roots as the prime source of these conflicts, reverse causation, running from economic policy to political conflict, has been virtually ignored in the debate. The purpose of this paper is to fill this gap through an in-depth case study of the 'twin political conflict' in Sri Lanka - the Tamil separatist war in the North and the Sinhala youth uprising in the South - with emphasis on its economic roots. The findings suggest that fundamental contradictions in the national development policy in the restrictive trade regime of Sri Lanka were at the heart of the country's twin political conflict. Copyright 2004 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Wiley Blackwell in its journal The World Economy.

    Volume (Year): 27 (2004)
    Issue (Month): 8 (08)
    Pages: 1295-1314

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    Handle: RePEc:bla:worlde:v:27:y:2004:i:8:p:1295-1314

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    Cited by:
    1. Yiping Huang & Jian Chang & Prema-Chandra Athukorala & Sisira Jayasuriya, 2013. "Economic Policy Shifts in Sri Lanka: The Post-Conflict Development Challenge," Asian Economic Papers, MIT Press, MIT Press, vol. 12(2), pages 1-28, June.
    2. Jin, Songqing & Deininger, Klaus W. & Sur, Mona, 2005. "Sri Lanka's Rural Non-farm Economy: Removing Constraints to Pro-poor Growth," 2005 Annual meeting, July 24-27, Providence, RI, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association) 19280, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    3. Sarah Brockhoff & Tim Krieger & Daniel Meierrieks, 2012. "Great Expectations and Hard Times - The (Nontrivial) Impact of Education on Domestic Terrorism," Working Papers CEB, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles 12-004, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    4. repec:pdn:wpaper:47 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Sharma, Kishor, 2006. "The political economy of civil war in Nepal," World Development, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 34(7), pages 1237-1253, July.
    6. Ramani Gunatilaka & Duangkamon Chotikapanich, 2006. "Inequality Trends and Determinants in Sri Lanka 1980-2002: A Shapley Approach to Decomposition," Monash Econometrics and Business Statistics Working Papers, Monash University, Department of Econometrics and Business Statistics 6/06, Monash University, Department of Econometrics and Business Statistics.
    7. Prema-chandra Athukorala, 2012. "Sri Lanka’s Trade Policy: Reverting to Dirigisme?," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 35(12), pages 1662-1686, December.
    8. Naranpanawa, Athula & Bandara, Jayatilleke S. & Selvanathan, Saroja, 2011. "Trade and poverty nexus: A case study of Sri Lanka," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 33(2), pages 328-346, March.
    9. Jain, Tarun, 2011. "Common tongue: The impact of language on economic performance," MPRA Paper 34423, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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